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dc.contributor.authorMajumder, Pallab
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-05T11:45:24Z
dc.date.available2018-01-05T11:45:24Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.citationHay, A., Majumder, P., Fosker, H., Karim, K. & O'Reilly, M. (2015). The views and opinions of CAMHS professionals on their role and the role of others in attending to children who self-harm. Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 20 (2), pp.289-303.en
dc.identifier.other10.1177/1359104513514068
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12904/10093
dc.description.abstractSelf-harm in young people is a common presentation to mental health services. There is little literature, however, on how professionals view their role and the role of others within the assessment of these young people, and the relative accountability. This study explored Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS) professionals’ views of these roles utilising a qualitative framework. The interviews of 18 CAMHS professionals from different disciplines were analysed using a thematic approach. Findings showed participants to be clear regarding the remit of their own role and the purpose of the assessment process, but were less confident in the abilities of those outside their service. They commented on the ongoing problems of stigma in this area and the difficulties with multi-agency working. Findings suggested possible ways to ameliorate these problems; however, the current economic climate may not be conducive to this. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved) (Source: journal abstract)en
dc.description.urihttp://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1359104513514068
dc.subjectAttitude of health personnelen
dc.subjectMental health servicesen
dc.subjectSelf-injurious behaviouren
dc.subjectMental healthen
dc.subjectCommunicationen
dc.titleThe views and opinions of CAMHS professionals on their role and the role of others in attending to children who self-harmen
dc.typeArticle


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