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dc.contributor.authorLindau, Tommy
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-20T15:44:52Z
dc.date.available2016-09-20T15:44:52Z
dc.date.issued2014-07
dc.identifier.citationJ Hand Surg Eur Vol. 2014 Jul;39(6):653-61. doi: 10.1177/1753193413518707. Epub 2014 Jan 8.language
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12904/1029
dc.description.abstractThis study retrospectively evaluated the medical records and radiographs of patients younger than aged 25 that were referred for a second opinion due to ulnar-sided wrist pain and persistent distal radio-ulnar (DRU) joint instability. We identified 85 patients with a major wrist trauma before the age of 18. Median age at trauma was 14 years. Median time between trauma and diagnosis of DRUJ instability was 3 years. Sixty-seven patients (79%) had sustained a fracture at the initial trauma. The two most common skeletal injuries related to the DRUJ instability were Salter-Harris type II fractures (24%) and distal radius fractures (19%). In 19 patients (22%), the secondary DRUJ instability was caused by malunion or growth arrest. Eighteen patients (21%) had no fracture; in spite of this, they presented with subsequent symptomatic DRUJ instability. Fourteen of these 18 patients had a triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) tear, confirmed by arthroscopy, open surgery, or magnetic resonance imaging. In conclusion, late DRUJ instability due to wrist fractures or isolated TFCC tears was found to be common in children and adolescents.LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: IV.language
dc.language.isoenlanguage
dc.subjectWrist Traumalanguage
dc.subjectDistal Radio-Ulnar Joint Instabilitylanguage
dc.subjectTriangular Fibrocartilage Complex Tearslanguage
dc.subjectAdolescentslanguage
dc.subjectChildrenlanguage
dc.subjectUlnar-Sided Wrist Painlanguage
dc.titleDistal radio-ulnar joint instability in children and adolescents after wrist trauma.language
dc.typeArticlelanguage


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