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dc.contributor.authorClegg, Jennifer
dc.date.accessioned2017-11-28T15:29:39Z
dc.date.available2017-11-28T15:29:39Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.identifier.citationBell, B. G. & Clegg, J. (2012). An ecological approach to reducing the social isolation of people with an intellectual disability. Ecological Psychology, 24 (2), pp.159-177en
dc.identifier.other10.1080/10407413.2012.673983
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12904/10483
dc.description.abstractAn ecological approach to understanding insecure attachments and social isolation among people with an intellectual disability is constructed using Gibson’s (1979/1986) affordance-based theory. Although environmental affordances and individual limitations interact to limit the development of social competence, we believe that by focusing on the immediate environment, community-based approaches to helping people with an intellectual disability are often ignored, which increases the burden on individual caregivers. A more comprehensive strategy, which extends Gibson’s theory of affordances, allows us to consider how higher level social systems influence the immediate environment and provides the context for understanding why successful change occurs when a multifaceted, holistic approach that works on several levels is adopted. Examining these systems within an ecological framework fundamentally redefines our thinking by shifting the focus from a person’s disability to a more nuanced understanding of a person’s abilities within the context of appropriate environmental supports in which the person’s disability becomes less salient. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved) (Source: journal abstract)
dc.description.urihttp://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/10407413.2012.673983
dc.subjectCaregiversen
dc.subjectSocial isolationen
dc.subjectIntellectual disabilityen
dc.titleAn ecological approach to reducing the social isolation of people with an intellectual disabilityen
dc.typeArticle
html.description.abstractAn ecological approach to understanding insecure attachments and social isolation among people with an intellectual disability is constructed using Gibson’s (1979/1986) affordance-based theory. Although environmental affordances and individual limitations interact to limit the development of social competence, we believe that by focusing on the immediate environment, community-based approaches to helping people with an intellectual disability are often ignored, which increases the burden on individual caregivers. A more comprehensive strategy, which extends Gibson’s theory of affordances, allows us to consider how higher level social systems influence the immediate environment and provides the context for understanding why successful change occurs when a multifaceted, holistic approach that works on several levels is adopted. Examining these systems within an ecological framework fundamentally redefines our thinking by shifting the focus from a person’s disability to a more nuanced understanding of a person’s abilities within the context of appropriate environmental supports in which the person’s disability becomes less salient. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved) (Source: journal abstract)


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