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dc.contributor.authorClegg, Jennifer
dc.date.accessioned2017-09-20T16:01:29Z
dc.date.available2017-09-20T16:01:29Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.citationHeijkoop, J., Clegg, J., and Webb, J. (2015). Video analyses discovery awareness. In: Oliver, C., (Ed.) 10th International Congress of the EAMIHD, 9-11 September 2015 Florence, Italy. Oxford: Journal of Intellectual Disability Research, p.6-7.
dc.identifier.other10.1111/jir.12214
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12904/10537
dc.description.abstractWatching differently, changes experiencing, thinking and acting within daily contacts. Heijkoop developed a tried, tested and unique way of video analysis which is called Discovery Awareness. The client is filmed in familiar surroundings. The footage is watched together with the patient's clinical team with the intention of analysing the visual material. There is always room for everyone's contribution; the focus while watching is on the client. When challenging behaviour exists, we assume that the self of the patient is in some way precarious and vulnerable, and seek to identify aspects on it for consideration. The best way we can come to understand the nature of their self is by becoming aware of the impact they have on us while striving to understand the world from their point of view. Yet the staff's view of the patient's personhood can get clouded by serious concerns regarding deterioration of the general development; by negative experiences resulting from the threat emanating from problem behaviour; and/or by difficulty making contact or communicating. In professional services, the view of a person can also be clouded by lack of time to think about the mat all. Yet only really seeing this person brings back the possibility of connecting. It is the very first step to self-strengthening. We study the here and now with people who are important within the person's daily life. This is a particular type of investigation that depends upon an active and open communication between those present as they talk with each other. The subject of study is on the one hand the feelings, expectations, thoughts, doubts, insecurities, worries, contacts and cooperation which the person with ID brings to meetings with important people. On the other hand it is about the feelings, expectations, thoughts, doubts, insecurities, worries, contacts and cooperation these important people themselves bring to their meetings with the patient. Most of all, the method enhances awareness of how these two sides fit and sometimes misfit. Conversation about these issues is conducted from an open and interested attitude, in particular without blaming or shaming anyone. The process addresses multiple aims. It seeks to increase general sensitivity to the patient and the motivation of staff to engage with them, since interaction is the fertiliser that strengthens the person's self. To identify deficits which require compensation from important others so that the patient's capabilities can flourish. And to start and support a process of individual and collective movement which leads to a more (inter)personal and safe space in which both important others and the patient can move. Furthermore, this instrument has a favourable influence on a few chronic sources of challenging behaviour and structural lack of well-being. Through the influence of the staff's attitude, there is an increasing degree of relaxed involvement in the moment. Therefore, the chance of contact and guidance being attuned to the person's interest as well as generating shared attention is greater. A lot of frustration, irritation or stress is thus dispelled. What you will experience: while the different parts of DA session are passed during this intensive pre-course, you will experience the shift of point of view towards the patient and becoming aware of your own perspective on him. What you will learn: recognizing the psychological and relational side effects of challenging behaviour, next to the physical and material damage it can cause. To understand that when challenging behaviour exists, the self of the patient is in some way precarious and vulnerable. That awareness of body language leads to the possibility of being able to watch and to listen to the patient's personhood in a more balanced way. To gain a better feel for the nuances in the clients body language by distinguishing between description, meaning and explanation during formal and informal communication. What used to be meaningless behaviour can be seen as signals of experience, emotions, involvement, taking initiative, communication, being in touch and self-management of challenging behaviour. To understand and recognise the quality of experiences which are self-strengthening, both for the patient and staff. That the increase of general sensitivity to the patient and the motivation of staff to engage with them, is the fertiliser of interaction that strengthens the person's self. To identify supportive-cooperation skills which favours self-strengthening experiences. Clegg has led on the use of the Method Heijkoop, particularly Discovery Awareness, in an acute in-patient unit since 2007. She will outline the way that she and a very psychologically-minded manager prepared the ground for staff to work with Jacques as visiting trainer and consultant. Together they made Discovery Awareness an essential component of the Orion Unit's assessment and treatment pathway, with the active support of colleagues in psychiatry and music therapy. What you will learn: how to implement a method, like DA, in a Health Care organisation to raise quality of care and treatment, which is supported by staff based on their internal motivation. Webb's research project ('The use of Discovery Awareness in Intellectual Disability Services: Examining a European approach to challenging behaviour in a UK setting') explores the use of Discovery Awareness (DA) in a UK context through the study its use in a single NHS setting. This study explores how Discovery Awareness (DA) sessions are structured and 'talked into being' by the people who participate in them. This is done by filming the DA sessions and using Conversation Analysis to analyse the interactions of the participating staff members. In addition, individual interviews have been conducted with staff members who participated in DA sessions which explore their experiences of using DA and their perceptions of its impact. What you will learn: to understand the relation between the way how the interactions in a DA session are structured and the quality of supportive cooperation.
dc.description.urihttp://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jir.12214/full
dc.subjectTelemedicine
dc.subjectIntellectual disability
dc.titleVideo analyses discovery awareness
dc.typeConference Proceeding


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