Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorTickle, Anna C.
dc.date.accessioned2017-09-20T16:01:46Z
dc.date.available2017-09-20T16:01:46Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.citationRamsden, S., Tickle, A. C., Dawson, D. L. & Harris, S. (2016). Perceived barriers and facilitators to positive therapeutic change for people with intellectual disabilities: Client, carer and clinical psychologist perspectives. Journal of Intellectual Disabilities, 20 (3), pp.241-262.
dc.identifier.other10.1177/1744629515612627
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12904/10601
dc.description.abstractStudies have highlighted successful outcomes of psychological therapies for people with intellectual disabilities. However, processes underlying these outcomes are uncertain. Thematic analysis was used to explore the perceptions of three clinical psychologists, six clients and six carers of barriers and facilitators to therapeutic change for people with intellectual disabilities. Six themes were identified relating to: what the client brings as an individual and with regard to their wider system; therapy factors, including the therapeutic relationship and adaptations; psychologists acting as a 'mental health GP' to coordinate care; systemic dependency; and the concept of the revolving door in intellectual disability services. The influence of barriers and facilitators to change is complex, with facilitators overcoming barriers and yet simultaneously creating more barriers. Given their potential impact on the psychologists' roles and access to therapy for people with intellectual disabilities, findings suggest these factors should be formulated as part of the therapeutic process.; © The Author(s) 2015.
dc.description.urihttp://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/1744629515612627?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub%3dpubmed
dc.subjectIntellectual disability
dc.subjectOutcome and process assessment (Health care)
dc.subjectPsychotherapy
dc.titlePerceived barriers and facilitators to positive therapeutic change for people with intellectual disabilities: Client, carer and clinical psychologist perspectives
dc.typeArticle


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record