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dc.contributor.authorSarkar, Jaydip
dc.date.accessioned2017-09-29T13:17:18Z
dc.date.available2017-09-29T13:17:18Z
dc.date.issued2010
dc.identifier.citationSarkar, J. (2010). Care and treatment of mentally disordered offenders in India. In: Bartlett, A. & McGauley, G. (eds.) Forensic mental health: Concepts, systems, and practice. New York, NY: Taylor and Francis, pp. 375-380.
dc.identifier.issn9780198566854
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12904/11489
dc.descriptionAvailable in the Library: http://tinyurl.com/lwy5kc4
dc.description.abstractIndia lags behind many of the liberal democratic societies of Europe and North America when it comes to providing safe and acceptable services to mentally disordered offenders (MDOs). The following paragraphs will introduce mental health law in India, the diversion of MDOs from the criminal justice system and the nature and extent of health care delivery to this group of individuals, with particular reference to human rights issues evident in service delivery. The status and relevance of forensic psychiatry in any country is largely dependent upon two things: law and ethics. The former establishes the statutes that must be adhered to, whereas the latter involves a discourse of the shoulds and musts that goes beyond statutory law. Absence of reasonable statutes, lack of their implementation where these do exist and the relative lack of a socio-political environment where the ethical implications of actions (or inaction) can be openly discussed and debated, will militate against an acceptable standard of forensic psychiatry in that country. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved)
dc.description.urihttps://global.oup.com/academic/product/forensic-mental-health-9780198566854?cc=gb&lang=en&
dc.subjectMentally ill offenders
dc.subjectMental disorders
dc.titleCare and treatment of mentally disordered offenders in India
dc.typeBook chapter


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