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dc.contributor.authorShubsachs, Alexander P. W.
dc.contributor.authorHuws, R. W.
dc.contributor.authorClose, Angela A.
dc.contributor.authorLarkin, Emmet P.
dc.date.accessioned2017-09-29T13:17:18Z
dc.date.available2017-09-29T13:17:18Z
dc.date.issued1995
dc.identifier.citationShubsachs, A. P. W., Huws, R. W., Close, A. A., Larkin, E. P. & Falvey, J. (1995). Male Afro-Caribbean patients admitted to Rampton Hospital between 1977 and 1986--a control study. Medicine, Science and the Law, 35 (4), pp.336-346.
dc.identifier.other10.1177/002580249503500412
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12904/11490
dc.description.abstractAll Afro-Caribbean patients admitted to the Mental Illness Division of Rampton Hospital (a Special Hospital) between 1977 and 1986 and a randomly selected control cohort of Non Afro-Caribbean patients admitted in the same period, were compared on a variety of sociodemographic, psychiatric, criminological, treatment and outcome variables. Significantly, fewer of the Afro-Caribbean patients attracted the legal classification of Psychopathic Disorder. Detailed analysis was thus restricted to mentally ill patients in the two ethnic groupings. Similarities outweighed differences. There was no difference between the groups in terms of index offence, previous custodial sentence, in-patient psychiatric admission (including previous Special Hospital admission), admission source, Mental Health Act section, length of admission (including readmission) to Special Hospitals, likelihood of discharge or place to which discharged. Medication history in Special Hospitals was similar at one year and three years after admission. Afro-Caribbean patients had a lower incidence of childhood institutional care, a decreased likelihood of a previous supervision order, an increased likelihood of a previous Court appearance and received higher doses of antipsychotic medication four weeks after admission to Special Hospital.
dc.description.urihttp://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/002580249503500412
dc.subjectMental disorders
dc.subjectPatient admission
dc.titleMale Afro-Caribbean patients admitted to Rampton Hospital between 1977 and 1986--a control study
dc.typeArticle
html.description.abstractAll Afro-Caribbean patients admitted to the Mental Illness Division of Rampton Hospital (a Special Hospital) between 1977 and 1986 and a randomly selected control cohort of Non Afro-Caribbean patients admitted in the same period, were compared on a variety of sociodemographic, psychiatric, criminological, treatment and outcome variables. Significantly, fewer of the Afro-Caribbean patients attracted the legal classification of Psychopathic Disorder. Detailed analysis was thus restricted to mentally ill patients in the two ethnic groupings. Similarities outweighed differences. There was no difference between the groups in terms of index offence, previous custodial sentence, in-patient psychiatric admission (including previous Special Hospital admission), admission source, Mental Health Act section, length of admission (including readmission) to Special Hospitals, likelihood of discharge or place to which discharged. Medication history in Special Hospitals was similar at one year and three years after admission. Afro-Caribbean patients had a lower incidence of childhood institutional care, a decreased likelihood of a previous supervision order, an increased likelihood of a previous Court appearance and received higher doses of antipsychotic medication four weeks after admission to Special Hospital.


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