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dc.contributor.authorBartlett, Peter
dc.date.accessioned2020-07-01T15:57:27Z
dc.date.available2020-07-01T15:57:27Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.citationTomlin, J., Bartlett, P., Furtado, V., Egan, V. & Völlm, B. (2020). An item response theory analysis of the Forensic Restrictiveness Questionnaire (FRQ). Journal of Forensic Psychiatry and Psychology, DOI: 10.1080/14789949.2020.1771614en
dc.identifier.other10.1080/14789949.2020.1771614
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12904/11613
dc.description.abstractForensic psychiatric care settings are intended to be more therapeutic than penal settings. More homely, recovery-oriented, person-centered, and less overtly punitive. However, forensic inpatient hospitals are highly secure, risk averse, and can diminish patient autonomy. A body of research is investigating how patients experience care and how these experiences are associated with treatment outcomes. The self-report FORENSIC RESTRICTIVENESS QUESTIONNAIRE (FRQ) is a 15-item measure of patients’ perceptions of the restrictions upon their autonomy. There has been interest in validating the FRQ in several countries. Despite preliminary empirical support for the FRQ, its psychometric properties are not well understood. In this paper we draw on Item-Response Theory (IRT) to investigate the properties of individual FRQ items to identify candidate items for alteration, removal or retention to assist researchers validating the FRQ in new contexts. Results suggest the FRQ is more sensitive to measuring the perceptions of patients that have above average amounts of perceived restrictiveness. Measurement error rises sharply for the approximately 5% highest scoring respondents but is low for the majority of individuals. Users are likely to respond in a dichotomised manner and not use the ‘Not Sure’ option. The response category ‘Not Applicable’ should be removed from a revised FRQ. © 2020, © 2020 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.en
dc.description.urihttps://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/14789949.2020.1771614en
dc.subjectSurveys and questionnairesen
dc.subjectMental healthen
dc.subjectMentally ill offendersen
dc.subjectPerceptionen
dc.subjectSelf reporten
dc.titleAn item response theory analysis of the Forensic Restrictiveness Questionnaire (FRQ)en
dc.typeArticleen


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