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dc.contributor.authorMilton, John
dc.contributor.authorRuck, Rosemary
dc.date.accessioned2017-09-29T14:20:48Z
dc.date.available2017-09-29T14:20:48Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.citationMilton, J. & Ruck, R. (2013). Library use by patients in an English maximum security hospital. The Psychiatrist, 37 (6), pp.188-191.
dc.identifier.other10.1192/pb.bp.112.039420
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12904/11660
dc.description.abstractAims and method: Scant clinical attention is usually paid to (a) forensic patients' reading interests or (b) the potential that library services may offer in providinginformation and therapy to patients. We undertook a cross-sectional serviceevaluation of patients' library attendance and use at Rampton high secure hospital in a12-month period between July 2009 and June 2010. Results: We collected information for 326 patients across all 28 wards. Almost 79% used the library service in some way, 66% borrowing music, 67% borrowing books and some borrowing both. Factual books were borrowed more than fiction, with graphic novels, talking books and self-help books about mental disorder all proving popular. Clinical implications: Reading and library use should be considered by clinicians in terms of the positive impact of improving literacy to enhance wider recovery, in relation to the impact of illness and medication effects on reading ability and the potential for providing health-related messages, illness education and reading therapy.
dc.description.urihttps://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/the-psychiatrist/article/library-use-by-patients-in-an-english-maximum-security-hospital/305DE218B60E84C8FB19C033A0C2D936
dc.subjectLibraries
dc.subjectHigh security facilities
dc.titleLibrary use by patients in an English maximum security hospital
dc.typeArticle
html.description.abstractAims and method: Scant clinical attention is usually paid to (a) forensic patients' reading interests or (b) the potential that library services may offer in providinginformation and therapy to patients. We undertook a cross-sectional serviceevaluation of patients' library attendance and use at Rampton high secure hospital in a12-month period between July 2009 and June 2010. Results: We collected information for 326 patients across all 28 wards. Almost 79% used the library service in some way, 66% borrowing music, 67% borrowing books and some borrowing both. Factual books were borrowed more than fiction, with graphic novels, talking books and self-help books about mental disorder all proving popular. Clinical implications: Reading and library use should be considered by clinicians in terms of the positive impact of improving literacy to enhance wider recovery, in relation to the impact of illness and medication effects on reading ability and the potential for providing health-related messages, illness education and reading therapy.


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