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dc.contributor.authorMiddleton, Hugh
dc.date.accessioned2017-09-06T12:40:26Z
dc.date.available2017-09-06T12:40:26Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.citationMiddleton, H. (2016). Flourishing and posttraumatic growth. An empirical take on ancient wisdoms. Health Care Analysis, 24 (2), pp.133-147.
dc.identifier.other10.1007/s10728-016-0318-2
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12904/12002
dc.description.abstractConsiderations of well-being or flourishing include Maslow's and Rogers' concepts of self-actualisation and actualising tendency. Recent empirical findings suggest that only a modest proportion of the population might be considered to be flourishing. Separate findings focused upon the nature and determinants of post-traumatic growth identify it as comparable to flourishing, and facilitated by supported accommodation to the trauma. This can be understood as reflecting self-actualisation. Empirical findings such as these provide ontological stability to a set of phenomena that share much with ancient teachings extolling redemption through suffering. This framework challenges conventional healthcare policies and practices, but in ways that offer insights into how patient-centred approaches to chronic illness and disability might be better conceived and enabled. It also throws into doubt the rectitude of an economic model built around services and products designed to provide easy access to sources of immediate gratification.;
dc.description.urihttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4866987/
dc.subjectMental health
dc.subjectPsychological models
dc.titleFlourishing and posttraumatic growth. An empirical take on ancient wisdoms
dc.typeArticle


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