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dc.contributor.authorFlood, Caroline
dc.date.accessioned2017-09-20T15:54:57Z
dc.date.available2017-09-20T15:54:57Z
dc.date.issued2008
dc.identifier.citationKerby, J., Calton, T., DiMambro, B., Flood, C. & Glazebrook, C. (2008). Anti-stigma films and medical student's attitudes towards mental illness and psychiatry: Randomised controlled trial. Psychiatric Bulletin, 32 (9), pp.345-349.
dc.identifier.other10.1192/pb.bp.107.017152
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12904/14641
dc.description.abstractAims and method: To explore the feasibility of a randomised controlled trial of the effects of two anti-stigma films on medical students' attitudes to serious mental illness and psychiatry. Attitudes to serious mental illness, perceived dangerousness, social distance and psychiatry, were measured before and after watching the films and at 8 weeks. Results: Intervention films significantly improved general attitudes to serious mental illness and social distance, with a trend towards reducing perceived dangerousness. These effects appeared to attenuate during the students' clinical placements, suggesting a possible interaction with their clinical experiences. Clinical implications: Our results suggest both that it may be possible to conduct a substantive trial of the effects of the intervention films on a larger cohort of medical students and that the films may be effective in reducing stigmatising attitudes in medical students.
dc.description.urihttps://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/psychiatric-bulletin/article/antistigma-films-and-medical-students-attitudes-towards-mental-illness-and-psychiatry-randomised-controlled-trial/8D32CA54E6954CF8F58704CCB7C573BB
dc.subjectStigma
dc.subjectMental disorders
dc.subjectMedical students
dc.subjectAttitude of health personnel
dc.titleAnti-stigma films and medical student's attitudes towards mental illness and psychiatry: Randomised controlled trial
dc.typeArticle


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