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dc.contributor.authorArora, Iti
dc.contributor.authorBellato, Alessio
dc.contributor.authorHollis, Chris P.
dc.contributor.authorGroom, Madeleine J.
dc.date.accessioned2021-07-26T12:12:42Z
dc.date.available2021-07-26T12:12:42Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.citationArora, I., Bellato, A., Ropar, D., Hollis, C. P. & Groom, M. J. (2021). Is autonomic function during resting-state atypical in autism: A systematic review of evidence. Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews, 125, pp.417-441.en_US
dc.identifier.other10.1016/j.neubiorev.2021.02.041
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12904/14691
dc.description.abstractBackground: Theories of differences in resting-state arousal in autistic individuals are influential. Differences in arousal during resting-state would impact engagement and adaptation to the environment, having a cascading effect on development of attentional and social skills. Objectives: We systematically evaluated the evidence for differences in measures of autonomic arousal (heart rate, pupillometry or electrodermal activity) during resting-state in autistic individuals; to understand whether certain contextual or methodological factors impact reports of such differences. Data sources: We searched PsycInfo, MEDLINE and EMBASE databases for papers published until 16th May 2019. Of 1207 titles initially identified, 60 met inclusion criteria. Results and Conclusions: Of the 51 studies that investigated group differences between neurotypical and autistic participants, 60.8 % found evidence of group differences. While findings of hyperarousal were more common, particularly using indices of parasympathetic function, findings of hypo-arousal and autonomic dysregulation were also consistently present. Importantly, experimental context played a role in revealing such differences. The evidence is discussed with regard to important methodological factors and implications for future research are described. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved) (Source: journal abstract)
dc.description.urihttps://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0149763421001019
dc.subjectAutism spectrum disorderen_US
dc.subjectHeart rateen_US
dc.titleIs autonomic function during resting-state atypical in autism: A systematic review of evidenceen_US
rioxxterms.funderDefault funderen_US
rioxxterms.identifier.projectDefault projecten_US
rioxxterms.versionNAen_US
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen_US
refterms.panelUnspecifieden_US
refterms.dateFirstOnline2021-03-01
html.description.abstractBackground: Theories of differences in resting-state arousal in autistic individuals are influential. Differences in arousal during resting-state would impact engagement and adaptation to the environment, having a cascading effect on development of attentional and social skills. Objectives: We systematically evaluated the evidence for differences in measures of autonomic arousal (heart rate, pupillometry or electrodermal activity) during resting-state in autistic individuals; to understand whether certain contextual or methodological factors impact reports of such differences. Data sources: We searched PsycInfo, MEDLINE and EMBASE databases for papers published until 16th May 2019. Of 1207 titles initially identified, 60 met inclusion criteria. Results and Conclusions: Of the 51 studies that investigated group differences between neurotypical and autistic participants, 60.8 % found evidence of group differences. While findings of hyperarousal were more common, particularly using indices of parasympathetic function, findings of hypo-arousal and autonomic dysregulation were also consistently present. Importantly, experimental context played a role in revealing such differences. The evidence is discussed with regard to important methodological factors and implications for future research are described. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved) (Source: journal abstract)en_US
rioxxterms.funder.project94a427429a5bcfef7dd04c33360d80cden_US


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