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dc.contributor.authorHui, Ada
dc.contributor.authorRennick-Egglestone, Stefan
dc.contributor.authorFranklin, Donna
dc.contributor.authorLlewellyn-Beardsley, Joy
dc.contributor.authorNg, Fiona
dc.contributor.authorRoe, James
dc.contributor.authorYeo, Caroline
dc.contributor.authorDeakin, Emilia
dc.contributor.authorPollock, Kristian
dc.contributor.authorSlade, Mike
dc.date.accessioned2021-07-28T09:33:22Z
dc.date.available2021-07-28T09:33:22Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.citationHui, A., Rennick-Egglestone, S., Franklin, D., Walcott, R., Llewellyn-Beardsley, J., Ng, F., Roe, J., Yeo, C., Deakin, E., Brydges, S., et al. (2021). Institutional injustice: Implications for system transformation emerging from the mental health recovery narratives of people experiencing marginalisation. PLoS ONE, 16(4), pp.e0250367.en_US
dc.identifier.other10.1371/journal.pone.0250367
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12904/14738
dc.description.abstractBackground Institutional injustice refers to structures that create disparities in resources, opportunities and representation. Marginalised people experience institutional injustice, inequalities and discrimination through intersecting personal characteristics and social circumstances. This study aimed to investigate sources of institutional injustice and their effects on marginalised people with experience of mental health problems. Methods Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 77 individuals from marginalised groups with experience of mental health problems, including psychosis, Black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) populations, complex needs and lived experience as a work requirement. These were analysed inductively enabling sensitising concepts to emerge. Findings Three processes of institutional injustice were identified: not being believed because of social status and personal backgrounds; not being heard where narratives did not align with dominant discourses, and not being acknowledged where aspects of identity were disregarded. Harmful outcomes included disengagement from formal institutions through fear and mistrust, tensions and reduced affiliation with informal institutions when trying to consolidate new ways of being, and damaging impacts on mental health and wellbeing through multiple oppression. Conclusions Institutional injustice perpetuates health inequalities and marginalised status. Master status, arising from dominant discourses and heuristic bias, overshadow the narratives and experiences of marginalised people. Cultural competency has the potential to improve heuristic availability through social understandings of narrative and experience, whilst coproduction and narrative development through approaches such as communities of practice might offer meaningful avenues for authentic expression.
dc.description.urihttps://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0250367
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectPsychosisen_US
dc.subjectEthnic groupsen_US
dc.subjectMental health recoveryen_US
dc.titleInstitutional injustice: Implications for system transformation emerging from the mental health recovery narratives of people experiencing marginalisationen_US
rioxxterms.funderDefault funderen_US
rioxxterms.identifier.projectDefault projecten_US
rioxxterms.versionNAen_US
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen_US
refterms.panelUnspecifieden_US
refterms.dateFirstOnline2021-04-16
html.description.abstractBackground Institutional injustice refers to structures that create disparities in resources, opportunities and representation. Marginalised people experience institutional injustice, inequalities and discrimination through intersecting personal characteristics and social circumstances. This study aimed to investigate sources of institutional injustice and their effects on marginalised people with experience of mental health problems. Methods Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 77 individuals from marginalised groups with experience of mental health problems, including psychosis, Black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) populations, complex needs and lived experience as a work requirement. These were analysed inductively enabling sensitising concepts to emerge. Findings Three processes of institutional injustice were identified: not being believed because of social status and personal backgrounds; not being heard where narratives did not align with dominant discourses, and not being acknowledged where aspects of identity were disregarded. Harmful outcomes included disengagement from formal institutions through fear and mistrust, tensions and reduced affiliation with informal institutions when trying to consolidate new ways of being, and damaging impacts on mental health and wellbeing through multiple oppression. Conclusions Institutional injustice perpetuates health inequalities and marginalised status. Master status, arising from dominant discourses and heuristic bias, overshadow the narratives and experiences of marginalised people. Cultural competency has the potential to improve heuristic availability through social understandings of narrative and experience, whilst coproduction and narrative development through approaches such as communities of practice might offer meaningful avenues for authentic expression.en_US
rioxxterms.funder.project94a427429a5bcfef7dd04c33360d80cden_US


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