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dc.contributor.authorPerez Vallejos, Elvira
dc.contributor.authorRawsthorne, Mat
dc.date.accessioned2021-07-28T09:58:09Z
dc.date.available2021-07-28T09:58:09Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.citationOng, Z. X., Dowthwaite, L., Perez Vallejos, E., Rawsthorne, M. & Long, Y. (2021). Measuring online wellbeing: A scoping review of subjective wellbeing measures. Frontiers in Psychology, 12, pp.616637.en_US
dc.identifier.other10.3389/fpsyg.2021.616637
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12904/14743
dc.description.abstractWith the increasing importance of the internet to our everyday lives, questions are rightly being asked about how its' use affects our wellbeing. It is important to be able to effectively measure the effects of the online context, as it allows us to assess the impact of specific online contexts on wellbeing that may not apply to offline wellbeing. This paper describes a scoping review of English language, peer-reviewed articles published in MEDLINE, EMBASE, and PsychInfo between 1st January 2015 and 31st December 2019 to identify what measures are used to assess subjective wellbeing and in particular to identify any measures used in the online context. Two hundred forty studies were identified; 160 studies were removed by abstract screening, and 17 studies were removed by full-text screening, leaving 63 included studies. Fifty-six subjective wellbeing scales were identified with 18 excluded and 38 included for further analysis. Only one study was identified researching online wellbeing, and no specific online wellbeing scale was found. Therefore, common features of the existing scales, such as the number and type of questions, are compared to offer recommendations for building an online wellbeing scale. Such a scale is recommended to be between 3 and 20 questions, using mainly 5-point Likert or Likert-like scales to measure at least positive and negative affect, and ideally life satisfaction, and to use mainly subjective evaluation. Further research is needed to establish how these findings for the offline world effectively translate into an online measure of wellbeing.
dc.description.urihttps://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fpsyg.2021.616637/full
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectAttitude to healthen_US
dc.subjectQuality of lifeen_US
dc.subjectHealth statusen_US
dc.subjectMental healthen_US
dc.subjectTelemedicineen_US
dc.titleMeasuring online wellbeing: A scoping review of subjective wellbeing measuresen_US
rioxxterms.funderDefault funderen_US
rioxxterms.identifier.projectDefault projecten_US
rioxxterms.versionNAen_US
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen_US
refterms.panelUnspecifieden_US
refterms.dateFirstOnline2021-03-11
html.description.abstractWith the increasing importance of the internet to our everyday lives, questions are rightly being asked about how its' use affects our wellbeing. It is important to be able to effectively measure the effects of the online context, as it allows us to assess the impact of specific online contexts on wellbeing that may not apply to offline wellbeing. This paper describes a scoping review of English language, peer-reviewed articles published in MEDLINE, EMBASE, and PsychInfo between 1st January 2015 and 31st December 2019 to identify what measures are used to assess subjective wellbeing and in particular to identify any measures used in the online context. Two hundred forty studies were identified; 160 studies were removed by abstract screening, and 17 studies were removed by full-text screening, leaving 63 included studies. Fifty-six subjective wellbeing scales were identified with 18 excluded and 38 included for further analysis. Only one study was identified researching online wellbeing, and no specific online wellbeing scale was found. Therefore, common features of the existing scales, such as the number and type of questions, are compared to offer recommendations for building an online wellbeing scale. Such a scale is recommended to be between 3 and 20 questions, using mainly 5-point Likert or Likert-like scales to measure at least positive and negative affect, and ideally life satisfaction, and to use mainly subjective evaluation. Further research is needed to establish how these findings for the offline world effectively translate into an online measure of wellbeing.en_US
rioxxterms.funder.project94a427429a5bcfef7dd04c33360d80cden_US


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