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dc.contributor.authordas Nair, Roshan
dc.date.accessioned2021-07-28T12:10:21Z
dc.date.available2021-07-28T12:10:21Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.citationGarjani, A., Middleton, R. M., Hunter, R., Tuite-Dalton, K. A., Coles, A., Dobson, R., Duddy, M., Hughes, S., Pearson, O. R., Rog, D., et al. (2021). COVID-19 is associated with new symptoms of multiple sclerosis that are prevented by disease modifying therapies. Multiple Sclerosis and Related Disorders, 52, pp.102939.en_US
dc.identifier.other10.1016/j.msard.2021.102939
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12904/14756
dc.description.abstractBackground: Infections can trigger exacerbations of multiple sclerosis (MS). The effects of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) on MS are not known. The aim of this study was to understand the impact of COVID-19 on new and pre-existing symptoms of MS. Method(s): The COVID-19 and MS study is an ongoing community-based, prospective cohort study conducted as part of the United Kingdom MS Register. People with MS and COVID-19 were invited by email to complete a questionnaire about their MS symptoms during the infection. An MS exacerbation was defined as developing new MS symptoms and/or worsening of pre-existing MS symptoms. Result(s): Fifty-seven percent (230/404) of participants had an MS exacerbation during their infection; 82 developed new MS symptoms, 207 experienced worsened pre-existing MS symptoms, and 59 reported both. Disease modifying therapies (DMTs) reduced the likelihood of developing new MS symptoms during the infection (OR 0.556, 95%CI 0.316-0.978). Participants with a higher pre-COVID-19 webEDSS (web-based Expanded Disability Status Scale) score (OR 1.251, 95%CI 1.060-1.478) and longer MS duration (OR 1.042, 95%CI 1.009-1.076) were more likely to experience worsening of their pre-existing MS symptoms during the infection. Conclusion(s): COVID-19 infection was associated with exacerbation of MS. DMTs reduced the chance of developing new MS symptoms during the infection. Copyright © 2021 IS - 2211-0348 EN - 2211-0356 DO - http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.msard.2021.102939
dc.description.urihttps://www.msard-journal.com/article/S2211-0348(21)00206-6/abstract#%20
dc.subjectCOVID-19en_US
dc.subjectSARS-CoV-2en_US
dc.subjectTelecommunicationsen_US
dc.subjectMultiple sclerosisen_US
dc.subjectSurveys and questionnairesen_US
dc.titleCOVID-19 is associated with new symptoms of multiple sclerosis that are prevented by disease modifying therapiesen_US
rioxxterms.funderDefault funderen_US
rioxxterms.identifier.projectDefault projecten_US
rioxxterms.versionNAen_US
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen_US
refterms.panelUnspecifieden_US
refterms.dateFirstOnline2021-05-04
html.description.abstractBackground: Infections can trigger exacerbations of multiple sclerosis (MS). The effects of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) on MS are not known. The aim of this study was to understand the impact of COVID-19 on new and pre-existing symptoms of MS. <br/>Method(s): The COVID-19 and MS study is an ongoing community-based, prospective cohort study conducted as part of the United Kingdom MS Register. People with MS and COVID-19 were invited by email to complete a questionnaire about their MS symptoms during the infection. An MS exacerbation was defined as developing new MS symptoms and/or worsening of pre-existing MS symptoms. <br/>Result(s): Fifty-seven percent (230/404) of participants had an MS exacerbation during their infection; 82 developed new MS symptoms, 207 experienced worsened pre-existing MS symptoms, and 59 reported both. Disease modifying therapies (DMTs) reduced the likelihood of developing new MS symptoms during the infection (OR 0.556, 95%CI 0.316-0.978). Participants with a higher pre-COVID-19 webEDSS (web-based Expanded Disability Status Scale) score (OR 1.251, 95%CI 1.060-1.478) and longer MS duration (OR 1.042, 95%CI 1.009-1.076) were more likely to experience worsening of their pre-existing MS symptoms during the infection. <br/>Conclusion(s): COVID-19 infection was associated with exacerbation of MS. DMTs reduced the chance of developing new MS symptoms during the infection.<br/>Copyright &#xa9; 2021 IS - 2211-0348 EN - 2211-0356 DO - http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.msard.2021.102939en_US
rioxxterms.funder.project94a427429a5bcfef7dd04c33360d80cden_US


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