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dc.contributor.authorSlade, Mike
dc.date.accessioned2021-07-29T09:56:01Z
dc.date.available2021-07-29T09:56:01Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.citationSkar-Fröding, R., Clausen, H. K., Šaltytė Benth, J., Ruud, T., Slade, M. & Sverdvik Heiervang, K. (2021). Relationship between satisfaction with mental health services, personal recovery and quality of life among service users with psychosis: a cross-sectional study. BMC Health Services Research, 21, pp.439.en_US
dc.identifier.other10.1186/s12913-021-06409-0
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12904/14769
dc.description.abstractBackground: Mental health policy internationally emphasizes patient centredness and personal recovery. This study investigated the relationship between satisfaction with mental health services among service users with psychosis in Norway, and personal recovery, perceived support for personal recovery, and quality of life. Methods: Cross-sectional data were collected from 292 service users diagnosed with psychosis from 39 clinical sites across Norway. Satisfaction with services was assessed using the Client Satisfaction Questionnaire-8. A linear mixed model was estimated to explore the relationship between satisfaction with services and preselected covariates, and to control for confounding factors. Results: A large majority of participants (89%) reported moderate-to-high levels of satisfaction. Satisfaction with services was positively associated with perceived support for personal recovery, but not with personal recovery or quality of life. In addition, service users under a Community Treatment Order (CTO) were significantly less satisfied than those who were not. Conclusions: Satisfaction levels among service users were higher compared with similar, international studies. Those who feel supported in their personal recovery were more satisfied with the care they receive, which support the need for implementation of recovery-oriented practices for service users with psychosis. However, satisfaction with services was not related to service user-rated quality of life or level of personal recovery; thus, more follow-up studies are needed. The lower satisfaction of service users placed under CTOs shows the importance of targeted interventions to improve satisfaction with services among this group.
dc.description.urihttps://bmchealthservres.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12913-021-06409-0
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectMental health servicesen_US
dc.subjectMental health recoveryen_US
dc.subjectQuality of lifeen_US
dc.subjectPsychosisen_US
dc.subjectPatient satisfactionen_US
dc.titleRelationship between satisfaction with mental health services, personal recovery and quality of life among service users with psychosis: a cross-sectional studyen_US
rioxxterms.funderDefault funderen_US
rioxxterms.identifier.projectDefault projecten_US
rioxxterms.versionNAen_US
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen_US
refterms.panelUnspecifieden_US
refterms.dateFirstOnline2021-05-08
html.description.abstractBackground: Mental health policy internationally emphasizes patient centredness and personal recovery. This study investigated the relationship between satisfaction with mental health services among service users with psychosis in Norway, and personal recovery, perceived support for personal recovery, and quality of life. Methods: Cross-sectional data were collected from 292 service users diagnosed with psychosis from 39 clinical sites across Norway. Satisfaction with services was assessed using the Client Satisfaction Questionnaire-8. A linear mixed model was estimated to explore the relationship between satisfaction with services and preselected covariates, and to control for confounding factors. Results: A large majority of participants (89%) reported moderate-to-high levels of satisfaction. Satisfaction with services was positively associated with perceived support for personal recovery, but not with personal recovery or quality of life. In addition, service users under a Community Treatment Order (CTO) were significantly less satisfied than those who were not. Conclusions: Satisfaction levels among service users were higher compared with similar, international studies. Those who feel supported in their personal recovery were more satisfied with the care they receive, which support the need for implementation of recovery-oriented practices for service users with psychosis. However, satisfaction with services was not related to service user-rated quality of life or level of personal recovery; thus, more follow-up studies are needed. The lower satisfaction of service users placed under CTOs shows the importance of targeted interventions to improve satisfaction with services among this group.en_US
rioxxterms.funder.project94a427429a5bcfef7dd04c33360d80cden_US


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