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dc.contributor.authorCrawford, Paul
dc.date.accessioned2021-07-29T12:23:53Z
dc.date.available2021-07-29T12:23:53Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.citationCrawford, P. & Crawford, J. O. (2021). Cabin fever: Surviving lockdown in the coronavirus pandemic: Emerald Group Publishing.en_US
dc.identifier.isbn9781800713550
dc.identifier.other10.1108/9781800713529
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12904/14787
dc.descriptionAvailable in the library: https://nottshc.koha-ptfs.co.uk/cgi-bin/koha/opac-detail.pl?biblionumber=104481
dc.description.abstractThis short book discusses the origins, definitions, social and cross-cultural history of the popularly framed condition of cabin fever in relation to what became the greatest confinement in history resulting from the coronavirus pandemic in 2020 (henceforth simply referred to as 'the pandemic') as governments imposed lockdown measures—e.g. quarantines, stay-at-home orders, shelter-in-place orders, shutdowns and curfews—to slow the spread of the virus. Indeed, it is estimated that around 4.2 billion, 54% of the global population, were subject to complete or partial lockdowns at the height of the pandemic (IEA, 2020). The book also examines creative individual and community responses to mass enforced isolation in its various forms. In the former, engagement and relationships may be limited, or at best, achieved only in virtual contexts such as through social media. For groups or communities, direct, physical connection presents a different challenge, not least achieving distance from others or wanting a break from them. The book examines the origins and definitions of cabin fever and related folk terminology or idioms. It explores the social and cross-cultural history of this phenomenon in relation to life at close quarters at sea, on land, in the air and in space. The book reviews the different antidotes to cabin fever, not least how isolation at home can provoke creative activities that mitigate and reduce its negative impacts. Whether one frames the greatest confinement in history as a kind of hibernation, suspended animation or perhaps more starkly as the kind of prolonged isolation found in penal systems there are aspects to the 'new normal' that defy passive suffering, trauma or irresolution. What has been particularly striking is the agency, ingenuity and creativity of individuals and communities while indoors. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved) (Source: chapter)
dc.description.uri
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectSocial mediaen_US
dc.subjectCOVID-19en_US
dc.subjectSARS-CoV-2en_US
dc.subjectPandemicsen_US
dc.subjectSocial isolationen_US
dc.titleCabin fever: Surviving lockdown in the coronavirus pandemicen_US
rioxxterms.funderDefault funderen_US
rioxxterms.identifier.projectDefault projecten_US
rioxxterms.versionNAen_US
rioxxterms.typeBooken_US
refterms.panelUnspecifieden_US
refterms.dateFirstOnline2021-03-18
html.description.abstractThis short book discusses the origins, definitions, social and cross-cultural history of the popularly framed condition of cabin fever in relation to what became the greatest confinement in history resulting from the coronavirus pandemic in 2020 (henceforth simply referred to as 'the pandemic') as governments imposed lockdown measures—e.g. quarantines, stay-at-home orders, shelter-in-place orders, shutdowns and curfews—to slow the spread of the virus. Indeed, it is estimated that around 4.2 billion, 54% of the global population, were subject to complete or partial lockdowns at the height of the pandemic (IEA, 2020). The book also examines creative individual and community responses to mass enforced isolation in its various forms. In the former, engagement and relationships may be limited, or at best, achieved only in virtual contexts such as through social media. For groups or communities, direct, physical connection presents a different challenge, not least achieving distance from others or wanting a break from them. The book examines the origins and definitions of cabin fever and related folk terminology or idioms. It explores the social and cross-cultural history of this phenomenon in relation to life at close quarters at sea, on land, in the air and in space. The book reviews the different antidotes to cabin fever, not least how isolation at home can provoke creative activities that mitigate and reduce its negative impacts. Whether one frames the greatest confinement in history as a kind of hibernation, suspended animation or perhaps more starkly as the kind of prolonged isolation found in penal systems there are aspects to the 'new normal' that defy passive suffering, trauma or irresolution. What has been particularly striking is the agency, ingenuity and creativity of individuals and communities while indoors. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved) (Source: chapter)en_US
rioxxterms.funder.project94a427429a5bcfef7dd04c33360d80cden_US


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