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dc.contributor.authorKontou, Eirini
dc.date.accessioned2021-09-06T15:36:21Z
dc.date.available2021-09-06T15:36:21Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.citationWebb, S. S., Kontou, E. & Demeyere, N. (2021). The COVID-19 pandemic altered the modality, but not the frequency, of formal cognitive assessment. Disability and Rehabilitation, DOI: 10.1080/09638288.2021.1963855en_US
dc.identifier.other10.1080/09638288.2021.1963855
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12904/14850
dc.description.abstractPurpose We investigated the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on the modality of formal cognitive assessments (in-person versus remote assessments). Materials and methods We created a web-based survey with 34 items and collected data from 114 respondents from a range of health care professions and settings. We established the proportion of cognitive assessments which were face-to-face or via video or telephone conferencing, both pre- and post-March 2020. Further, we asked respondents about the assessment tools used and perceived barriers, challenges, and facilitators for the remote assessment of cognition. In addition, we asked questions specifically about the use of the Oxford Cognitive Screen. Results We found that the frequency of assessing cognition was stable compared to pre-pandemic levels. Use of telephone and video conferencing cognitive assessments increased by 10% and 18% respectively. Remote assessment increased accessibility to participants and safety but made observing the subtleties of behaviour during test administration difficult. The respondents called for an increase in the availability of standardised, validated, and normed assessments. Conclusions We conclude that the pandemic has not been detrimental to the frequency of cognitive assessments. In addition, a shift in clinical practice to include remote cognitive assessments is clear and wider availability of validated and standardised remote assessments is necessary.
dc.description.urihttps://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/09638288.2021.1963855
dc.subjectCOVID-19en_US
dc.subjectSARS-CoV-2en_US
dc.subjectRemote consultationen_US
dc.subjectTelemedicineen_US
dc.subjectRehabilitationen_US
dc.titleThe COVID-19 pandemic altered the modality, but not the frequency, of formal cognitive assessmenten_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
rioxxterms.funderDefault funderen_US
rioxxterms.identifier.projectDefault projecten_US
rioxxterms.versionNAen_US
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen_US
refterms.panelUnspecifieden_US
refterms.dateFirstOnline2021-08-16
html.description.abstractPurpose We investigated the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on the modality of formal cognitive assessments (in-person versus remote assessments). Materials and methods We created a web-based survey with 34 items and collected data from 114 respondents from a range of health care professions and settings. We established the proportion of cognitive assessments which were face-to-face or via video or telephone conferencing, both pre- and post-March 2020. Further, we asked respondents about the assessment tools used and perceived barriers, challenges, and facilitators for the remote assessment of cognition. In addition, we asked questions specifically about the use of the Oxford Cognitive Screen. Results We found that the frequency of assessing cognition was stable compared to pre-pandemic levels. Use of telephone and video conferencing cognitive assessments increased by 10% and 18% respectively. Remote assessment increased accessibility to participants and safety but made observing the subtleties of behaviour during test administration difficult. The respondents called for an increase in the availability of standardised, validated, and normed assessments. Conclusions We conclude that the pandemic has not been detrimental to the frequency of cognitive assessments. In addition, a shift in clinical practice to include remote cognitive assessments is clear and wider availability of validated and standardised remote assessments is necessary.en_US
dc.description.urlhttps://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/09638288.2021.1963855en_US
rioxxterms.funder.project94a427429a5bcfef7dd04c33360d80cden_US


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