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dc.contributor.authordas Nair, Roshan
dc.date.accessioned2021-10-14T08:34:33Z
dc.date.available2021-10-14T08:34:33Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.citationGrech, L. B., Hunter, A., das Nair, R., Borland, R. & Marck, C. H. (2021). Improving smoking cessation support for people with multiple sclerosis: A qualitative analysis of clinicians' views and current practice. Multiple Sclerosis and Related Disorders, 56, pp.103289.en_US
dc.identifier.other10.1016/j.msard.2021.103289
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12904/14916
dc.description.abstractIntroduction Smoking is a key modifiable risk factor in multiple sclerosis (MS). MS healthcare providers have a central role informing people of the deleterious effects of smoking on MS progression and promote smoking cessation, yet there is limited information about smoking cessation and support provided by these providers. This study aimed to gain an understanding of MS healthcare providers current practices, barriers and facilitators related to providing smoking cessation support for people with MS. Methods A total of 13 MS nurses and 6 neurologists working in public and private MS clinics across Australia were recruited through professional networks and MS organisations. Telephone interviews were conducted, transcribed and evaluated using framework analysis. Results MS nurses and neurologists reported that they routinely assess smoking status of people with MS at initial appointments and less regularly also at follow-up appointments. Clinicians considered it important to provide information about smoking impact on MS health outcomes and advise to cease smoking, but the content and delivery varies. Beyond this, some clinicians offer referral for smoking cessation support, while others stated this was not their responsibility, especially in light of competing priorities. Many were unsure about referral pathways and options, requiring more information, training and resources. Conclusion Results of this research indicate that there is potential to improve support for MS clinicians to promote smoking cessation among people with MS. Smoking cessation support may include tailored patient resources, clinician training and stronger collaboration with smoking cessation service providers.
dc.description.urihttps://www.msard-journal.com/article/S2211-0348(21)00556-3/fulltext#%20en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectSmoking cessationen_US
dc.subjectMultiple sclerosisen_US
dc.titleImproving smoking cessation support for people with multiple sclerosis: A qualitative analysis of clinicians' views and current practiceen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
rioxxterms.funderDefault funderen_US
rioxxterms.identifier.projectDefault projecten_US
rioxxterms.versionNAen_US
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen_US
refterms.panelUnspecifieden_US
refterms.dateFirstOnline2021-11-01
html.description.abstractIntroduction Smoking is a key modifiable risk factor in multiple sclerosis (MS). MS healthcare providers have a central role informing people of the deleterious effects of smoking on MS progression and promote smoking cessation, yet there is limited information about smoking cessation and support provided by these providers. This study aimed to gain an understanding of MS healthcare providers current practices, barriers and facilitators related to providing smoking cessation support for people with MS. Methods A total of 13 MS nurses and 6 neurologists working in public and private MS clinics across Australia were recruited through professional networks and MS organisations. Telephone interviews were conducted, transcribed and evaluated using framework analysis. Results MS nurses and neurologists reported that they routinely assess smoking status of people with MS at initial appointments and less regularly also at follow-up appointments. Clinicians considered it important to provide information about smoking impact on MS health outcomes and advise to cease smoking, but the content and delivery varies. Beyond this, some clinicians offer referral for smoking cessation support, while others stated this was not their responsibility, especially in light of competing priorities. Many were unsure about referral pathways and options, requiring more information, training and resources. Conclusion Results of this research indicate that there is potential to improve support for MS clinicians to promote smoking cessation among people with MS. Smoking cessation support may include tailored patient resources, clinician training and stronger collaboration with smoking cessation service providers.en_US
rioxxterms.funder.project94a427429a5bcfef7dd04c33360d80cden_US


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