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dc.contributor.authorCarter, Tim
dc.date.accessioned2021-10-18T14:58:12Z
dc.date.available2021-10-18T14:58:12Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.citationPascoe, M. C., Bailey, A. P., Craike, M., Carter, T., Patten, R. K., Stepto, N. K. & Parker, A. G. (2021). Single session and short-term exercise for mental health promotion in tertiary students: A scoping review. Sports Medicine - Open, 7(1), pp.72.en_US
dc.identifier.other10.1186/s40798-021-00358-y
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12904/14922
dc.description.abstractExercise can improve mental health; however many tertiary students do not reach recommended levels of weekly engagement. Short-term exercise may be more achievable for tertiary students to engage in to promote mental health, particularly during times of high stress. The current scoping review aimed to provide an overview of controlled trials testing the effect of short-term (single bout and up to 3 weeks) exercise across mental health domains, both at rest and in response to an experimentally manipulated laboratory stress task, in tertiary students. The search was conducted using 'Evidence Finder,' a database of published and systematic reviews and controlled trials of interventions in the youth mental health field. A total of 14 trials meet inclusion criteria, six measured mental health symptoms in response to an experimentally manipulated laboratory stress task and the remaining eight measured mental health symptoms. We found that short-term exercise interventions appeared to reduce anxiety like symptoms and anxiety sensitivity and buffered against a drop in mood following an experimentally manipulated laboratory stress task. There was limited available evidence testing the impacts of exercise on depression like symptoms and other mental health mental health domains, suggesting further work is required. Universities should consider implementing methods to increase student knowledge about the relationship between physical exercise and mental health and student access to exercise facilities.
dc.description.urihttps://sportsmedicine-open.springeropen.com/articles/10.1186/s40798-021-00358-yen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectExerciseen_US
dc.subjectMental healthen_US
dc.titleSingle session and short-term exercise for mental health promotion in tertiary students: A scoping reviewen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
rioxxterms.funderDefault funderen_US
rioxxterms.identifier.projectDefault projecten_US
rioxxterms.versionNAen_US
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen_US
refterms.panelUnspecifieden_US
refterms.dateFirstOnline11/10/2021
html.description.abstractExercise can improve mental health; however many tertiary students do not reach recommended levels of weekly engagement. Short-term exercise may be more achievable for tertiary students to engage in to promote mental health, particularly during times of high stress. The current scoping review aimed to provide an overview of controlled trials testing the effect of short-term (single bout and up to 3 weeks) exercise across mental health domains, both at rest and in response to an experimentally manipulated laboratory stress task, in tertiary students. The search was conducted using 'Evidence Finder,' a database of published and systematic reviews and controlled trials of interventions in the youth mental health field. A total of 14 trials meet inclusion criteria, six measured mental health symptoms in response to an experimentally manipulated laboratory stress task and the remaining eight measured mental health symptoms. We found that short-term exercise interventions appeared to reduce anxiety like symptoms and anxiety sensitivity and buffered against a drop in mood following an experimentally manipulated laboratory stress task. There was limited available evidence testing the impacts of exercise on depression like symptoms and other mental health mental health domains, suggesting further work is required. Universities should consider implementing methods to increase student knowledge about the relationship between physical exercise and mental health and student access to exercise facilities.
rioxxterms.funder.project94a427429a5bcfef7dd04c33360d80cden_US


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