Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorIbrahim, Wadah
dc.contributor.authorZhao, Bo
dc.contributor.authorSingapuri, Amisha
dc.contributor.authorMcNally, Teresa
dc.contributor.authorFree, Robert
dc.contributor.authorGreening, Neil
dc.contributor.authorGaillard, Erol
dc.contributor.authorBrightling, Christopher
dc.contributor.authorSiddiqui, Salman
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-25T15:24:35Z
dc.date.available2021-11-25T15:24:35Z
dc.date.issued2021-11-01
dc.identifier.citationSalman, D., Ibrahim, W., Kanabar, A., Joyce, A., Zhao, B., Singapuri, A., Wilde, M., Cordell, R., McNally, T., Ruszkiewicz, D. M., Hadjithekli, A., Free, R., Greening, N., Gaillard, E., Beardsmore, C., Monks, P. S., Brightling, C. E., Siddiqui, S., & Thomas, C. (2021). The variability of volatile organic compounds in the indoor air of clinical environments. Journal of breath research, 10.1088/1752-7163/ac3565.en_US
dc.identifier.other10.1088/1752-7163/ac3565
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12904/14986
dc.description.abstractThe development of clinical breath-analysis is confounded by the variability of background volatile organic compounds (VOC). Reliable interpretation of clinical breath-analysis at individual, and cohort levels requires characterisation of clinical-VOC levels and exposures. Active-sampling with thermal-desorption/gas chromatography-mass spectrometry recorded and evaluated VOC concentrations in 245 samples of indoor air from three sites in a large NHS provider trust in the UK over 27 months. Data deconvolution, alignment and clustering isolated 7344 features attributable to VOC and described the variability (composition and concentration) of respirable clinical VOC. 328 VOC were observed in more than 5% of the samples and 68 VOC appeared in more than 30% of samples. Common VOC were associated with exogenous and endogenous sources and 17 VOC were identified as seasonal differentiators. The presence of metabolites from the anaesthetic sevoflurane, and putative-disease biomarkers in room air, indicated that exhaled VOC were a source of background-pollution in clinical breath-testing activity. With the exception of solvents, and PPE waxes, exhaled VOC concentrations above 3 µg m-3are unlikely to arise from room air contamination, and in the absence of extensive survey-data, this level could be applied as a threshold for inclusion in studies, removing a potential environmental confounding-factor in developing breath-based diagnostics.
dc.description.urihttps://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/1752-7163/ac3565en_US
dc.subjectBreath analysisen_US
dc.subjectIndoor air pollutionen_US
dc.subjectVolatile organic compoundsen_US
dc.titleThe variability of volatile organic compounds in the indoor air of clinical environmentsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
rioxxterms.funderDefault funderen_US
rioxxterms.identifier.projectDefault projecten_US
rioxxterms.versionNAen_US
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen_US
refterms.panelUnspecifieden_US
refterms.dateFirstOnline2021-11-01
html.description.abstractThe development of clinical breath-analysis is confounded by the variability of background volatile organic compounds (VOC). Reliable interpretation of clinical breath-analysis at individual, and cohort levels requires characterisation of clinical-VOC levels and exposures. Active-sampling with thermal-desorption/gas chromatography-mass spectrometry recorded and evaluated VOC concentrations in 245 samples of indoor air from three sites in a large NHS provider trust in the UK over 27 months. Data deconvolution, alignment and clustering isolated 7344 features attributable to VOC and described the variability (composition and concentration) of respirable clinical VOC. 328 VOC were observed in more than 5% of the samples and 68 VOC appeared in more than 30% of samples. Common VOC were associated with exogenous and endogenous sources and 17 VOC were identified as seasonal differentiators. The presence of metabolites from the anaesthetic sevoflurane, and putative-disease biomarkers in room air, indicated that exhaled VOC were a source of background-pollution in clinical breath-testing activity. With the exception of solvents, and PPE waxes, exhaled VOC concentrations above 3 µg m-3are unlikely to arise from room air contamination, and in the absence of extensive survey-data, this level could be applied as a threshold for inclusion in studies, removing a potential environmental confounding-factor in developing breath-based diagnostics.en_US
rioxxterms.funder.project94a427429a5bcfef7dd04c33360d80cden_US


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record