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dc.contributor.authorStokes, V
dc.contributor.authorSurridge, Jason
dc.date.accessioned2021-12-09T11:40:30Z
dc.date.available2021-12-09T11:40:30Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.citationBMJ Case Rep. 2021 Nov 9;14(11):e244189. doi: 10.1136/bcr-2021-244189.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12904/15026
dc.description.abstractRhombencephalitis is a rare condition, often caused by infection, commonly presenting with myoclonic jerks, ataxia and cranial nerve palsy. Typically, it has a high morbidity and mortality, with worse prognosis associated with cardiopulmonary involvement. Herein, we present the case of a 10-year-old boy, presenting with headache, vomiting, symptomatic bradycardia and rapidly progressing ophthalmoplegia from a sixth nerve palsy, without additional brainstem symptoms. Previously, pericarditis, myocarditis and heart failure have been associated with rhombencephalitis, but not bradycardia. The cause of his rhombencephalitis was presumed viral, but despite extensive screening, the virus responsible was never isolated. Following treatment with intravenous antibiotics and antivirals in a high dependency unit, he recovered well with no neurological deficit on discharge and marked radiological improvement on MRI 4 weeks later. Although rare, rhombencephalitis should be considered in a child presenting with neurological symptoms, particularly alongside a cranial nerve palsy, developing over a rapid time course.
dc.publisherBMJen_US
dc.subjectBrain Stemen_US
dc.subjectCerebellumen_US
dc.subjectEmergency Medicineen_US
dc.subjectHeadacheen_US
dc.subjectMigrainesen_US
dc.subjectPaediatricsen_US
dc.titlePaediatric rhombencephalitis presenting with bradycardia: a good recovery despite cardiac involvement.en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
rioxxterms.funderDefault funderen_US
rioxxterms.identifier.projectDefault projecten_US
rioxxterms.versionNAen_US
rioxxterms.versionofrecordDOI: 10.1136/bcr-2021-244189en_US
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen_US
refterms.panelUnspecifieden_US
refterms.dateFirstOnline2021-11
html.description.abstractRhombencephalitis is a rare condition, often caused by infection, commonly presenting with myoclonic jerks, ataxia and cranial nerve palsy. Typically, it has a high morbidity and mortality, with worse prognosis associated with cardiopulmonary involvement. Herein, we present the case of a 10-year-old boy, presenting with headache, vomiting, symptomatic bradycardia and rapidly progressing ophthalmoplegia from a sixth nerve palsy, without additional brainstem symptoms. Previously, pericarditis, myocarditis and heart failure have been associated with rhombencephalitis, but not bradycardia. The cause of his rhombencephalitis was presumed viral, but despite extensive screening, the virus responsible was never isolated. Following treatment with intravenous antibiotics and antivirals in a high dependency unit, he recovered well with no neurological deficit on discharge and marked radiological improvement on MRI 4 weeks later. Although rare, rhombencephalitis should be considered in a child presenting with neurological symptoms, particularly alongside a cranial nerve palsy, developing over a rapid time course.en_US
rioxxterms.funder.project94a427429a5bcfef7dd04c33360d80cden_US


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