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dc.contributor.authorNg, Fiona
dc.contributor.authorRennick-Egglestone, Stefan
dc.contributor.authorNewby, Christopher
dc.contributor.authorHare-Duke, Laurie
dc.contributor.authorLlewellyn-Beardsley, Joy
dc.contributor.authorYeo, Caroline
dc.contributor.authorSlade, Mike
dc.date.accessioned2021-12-23T16:10:30Z
dc.date.available2021-12-23T16:10:30Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.citationNg, F., Ibrahim, N., Franklin, D., Jordan, G., Lewandowski, F., Fang, F., Roe, D., Rennick-Egglestone, S., Newby, C., Hare-Duke, L., et al. (2021). Post-traumatic growth in psychosis: a systematic review and narrative synthesis. BMC Psychiatry, 21(1), pp.607.en_US
dc.identifier.other10.1186/s12888-021-03614-3
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12904/15042
dc.descriptionOpen Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article's Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated in a credit line to the data.en_US
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVEPeople with psychosis report experiences of highly traumatic events. Positive change or post-traumatic growth (PTG) can occur as a result of traumatic experiences. Yet there is limited attention on PTG in psychosis, possibly due to the negative impact of psychotic symptoms on functioning and quality of life. The aim of this review was to identify significant correlates and mediators of PTG in psychosis, and to develop a conceptual framework synthesising facilitators of PTG in psychosis.METHODTen electronic databases were searched in seven languages, and five journals and grey literature were searched in English. Quantitative studies were eligible if examining correlates, mediators, or the temporal relationship between PTG and one or more variables. Qualitative studies were eligible if describing PTG arising from experiences of psychosis. Findings from quantitative papers were grouped by analysis method, with significant correlates, mediators, and temporal relationships descriptively reported upon. Narrative synthesis was conducted on findings in qualitative papers.RESULTSThirty-seven papers were included. Significant correlates and mediators of PTG were identified. Mediators of PTG in psychosis included meaning in life, coping self-efficacy, core beliefs, and self-reported recovery. No studies describing the temporal relationship between PTG and psychosis were identified. The narrative synthesis identified seven facilitators of PTG in psychosis: Personal identity and strength, Receiving support, Opportunities and possibilities, Strategies for coping, Perspective shift, Emotional experience, and Relationships, giving the acronym PROSPER.CONCLUSIONSIndividuals with psychosis can be supported to grow from traumatic experiences. Clinicians can support PTG through the provision of trauma-informed care that supports positively valued identity changes. For researchers, the findings provide an evidence-based theoretical framework for conceptualising PTG, which can be validated through longitudinal cohort studies and underpin the development of new clinical interventions.
dc.description.urihttps://bmcpsychiatry.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12888-021-03614-3en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectPsychosisen_US
dc.subjectPsychological adaptationen_US
dc.subjectPsychological posttraumatic growthen_US
dc.titlePost-traumatic growth in psychosis: a systematic review and narrative synthesisen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
rioxxterms.funderDefault funderen_US
rioxxterms.identifier.projectDefault projecten_US
rioxxterms.versionNAen_US
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen_US
refterms.dateFOA2021-12-23T16:10:30Z
refterms.panelUnspecifieden_US
refterms.dateFirstOnline2021-12-06
html.description.abstractBACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVEPeople with psychosis report experiences of highly traumatic events. Positive change or post-traumatic growth (PTG) can occur as a result of traumatic experiences. Yet there is limited attention on PTG in psychosis, possibly due to the negative impact of psychotic symptoms on functioning and quality of life. The aim of this review was to identify significant correlates and mediators of PTG in psychosis, and to develop a conceptual framework synthesising facilitators of PTG in psychosis.METHODTen electronic databases were searched in seven languages, and five journals and grey literature were searched in English. Quantitative studies were eligible if examining correlates, mediators, or the temporal relationship between PTG and one or more variables. Qualitative studies were eligible if describing PTG arising from experiences of psychosis. Findings from quantitative papers were grouped by analysis method, with significant correlates, mediators, and temporal relationships descriptively reported upon. Narrative synthesis was conducted on findings in qualitative papers.RESULTSThirty-seven papers were included. Significant correlates and mediators of PTG were identified. Mediators of PTG in psychosis included meaning in life, coping self-efficacy, core beliefs, and self-reported recovery. No studies describing the temporal relationship between PTG and psychosis were identified. The narrative synthesis identified seven facilitators of PTG in psychosis: Personal identity and strength, Receiving support, Opportunities and possibilities, Strategies for coping, Perspective shift, Emotional experience, and Relationships, giving the acronym PROSPER.CONCLUSIONSIndividuals with psychosis can be supported to grow from traumatic experiences. Clinicians can support PTG through the provision of trauma-informed care that supports positively valued identity changes. For researchers, the findings provide an evidence-based theoretical framework for conceptualising PTG, which can be validated through longitudinal cohort studies and underpin the development of new clinical interventions.en_US
rioxxterms.funder.project94a427429a5bcfef7dd04c33360d80cden_US


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