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dc.contributor.authordas Nair, Roshan
dc.date.accessioned2022-01-25T13:03:00Z
dc.date.available2022-01-25T13:03:00Z
dc.date.issued2022
dc.identifier.citationNomikos, P. A., Hall, M. C., Fuller, A., Ogollah, R., Valdes, A. M., Doherty, M., Walsh, D. A., das Nair, R. & Abhishek, A. (2022). Acceptability of a nurse-led non-pharmacological complex intervention for knee pain: Nurse and patient views and experiences. PLoS ONE, 17(1), pp.e0262422.en_US
dc.identifier.other10.1371/journal.pone.0262422
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12904/15098
dc.description© 2022 Nomikos et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.en_US
dc.description.abstractObjectives The overall purpose of this research programme is to develop and test the feasibility of a complex intervention for knee pain delivered by a nurse, and comprising both non-pharmacological and pharmacological interventions. In this first phase, we examined the acceptability of the non-pharmacological component of the intervention; issues faced in delivery, and resolved possible challenges to delivery. Methods Eighteen adults with chronic knee pain were recruited from the community. The intervention comprised holistic assessment, education, exercise, weight-loss advice (where appropriate) and advice on adjunctive treatments such as hot/cold treatments, footwear modification and walking aids. After nurse training, the intervention was delivered in four sessions spread over five weeks. Participants had one to one semi-structured interview at the end of the intervention. The nurse was interviewed after the last visit of the last participant. These were audio recorded and transcribed verbatim. Themes were identified by one author through framework analysis of the transcripts, and cross-checked by another. Results Most participants found the advice from the nurse easy to follow and were satisfied with the package, though some felt that too much information was provided too soon. The intervention changed their perception of managing knee pain, learning that it can be improved with self-management. However, participants thought that the most challenging part of the intervention was fitting the exercise regime into their daily routine. The nurse found discussion of goal setting to be challenging. Conclusion The nurse-led package of care is acceptable within a research setting. The results are promising and will be applied in a feasibility randomised-controlled trial.
dc.description.urihttps://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0262422en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectNursingen_US
dc.subjectKneeen_US
dc.subjectOsteoarthritisen_US
dc.subjectWeight lossen_US
dc.subjectExerciseen_US
dc.titleAcceptability of a nurse-led non-pharmacological complex intervention for knee pain: Nurse and patient views and experiencesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
rioxxterms.funderDefault funderen_US
rioxxterms.identifier.projectDefault projecten_US
rioxxterms.versionNAen_US
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen_US
refterms.dateFOA2022-01-25T13:03:00Z
refterms.panelUnspecifieden_US
refterms.dateFirstOnline2022-01-13
html.description.abstractObjectives The overall purpose of this research programme is to develop and test the feasibility of a complex intervention for knee pain delivered by a nurse, and comprising both non-pharmacological and pharmacological interventions. In this first phase, we examined the acceptability of the non-pharmacological component of the intervention; issues faced in delivery, and resolved possible challenges to delivery. Methods Eighteen adults with chronic knee pain were recruited from the community. The intervention comprised holistic assessment, education, exercise, weight-loss advice (where appropriate) and advice on adjunctive treatments such as hot/cold treatments, footwear modification and walking aids. After nurse training, the intervention was delivered in four sessions spread over five weeks. Participants had one to one semi-structured interview at the end of the intervention. The nurse was interviewed after the last visit of the last participant. These were audio recorded and transcribed verbatim. Themes were identified by one author through framework analysis of the transcripts, and cross-checked by another. Results Most participants found the advice from the nurse easy to follow and were satisfied with the package, though some felt that too much information was provided too soon. The intervention changed their perception of managing knee pain, learning that it can be improved with self-management. However, participants thought that the most challenging part of the intervention was fitting the exercise regime into their daily routine. The nurse found discussion of goal setting to be challenging. Conclusion The nurse-led package of care is acceptable within a research setting. The results are promising and will be applied in a feasibility randomised-controlled trial.en_US
rioxxterms.funder.project94a427429a5bcfef7dd04c33360d80cden_US


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