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dc.contributor.authorSlade, Mike
dc.date.accessioned2022-01-25T13:17:58Z
dc.date.available2022-01-25T13:17:58Z
dc.date.issued2022
dc.identifier.citationSkar-Fröding, R., Clausen, H., Šaltytė Benth, J., Ruud, T., Slade, M. & S Heiervang, K. (2022). Associations between personal recovery and service user-rated versus clinician-rated clinical recovery, a cross-sectional study. BMC Psychiatry, 22(1), pp.42.en_US
dc.identifier.other10.1186/s12888-022-03691-y
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12904/15100
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUNDThis study examined the relationship between service user-rated personal recovery and clinician-rated and service user-rated clinical recovery. The relationships between different subdomains of clinical recovery and personal recovery were also assessed.METHODSIn total, 318 mental health service users with a psychosis diagnosis and their clinicians from 39 sites across Norway completed standardized questionnaires regarding personal recovery, clinical symptoms and psychosocial functioning. Regression models were used to investigate the relationship between personal and clinical recovery.RESULTSOverall, clinical recovery was positively associated with personal recovery, when rated both by service users and by clinicians. Personal recovery was associated with lower levels of depression, self-harm and problems with relationships when rated by the service users. Among the subdomains rated by the clinicians, personal recovery was associated with fewer problems with relationships and higher aggressiveness.CONCLUSIONSThese findings suggest that affective symptoms are associated with personal recovery, indicating the need for greater focus on depression treatment among people with psychosis. Improving social connections is of importance for personal recovery, and might be an area where clinicians and service users can meet and find agreement on important treatment goals.
dc.subjectPsychosisen_US
dc.subjectRehabilitationen_US
dc.titleAssociations between personal recovery and service user-rated versus clinician-rated clinical recovery, a cross-sectional studyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
rioxxterms.funderDefault funderen_US
rioxxterms.identifier.projectDefault projecten_US
rioxxterms.versionNAen_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://bmcpsychiatry.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12888-022-03691-yen_US
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen_US
refterms.dateFOA2022-10-03T09:04:11Z
refterms.panelUnspecifieden_US
refterms.dateFirstOnline2022-01-18
html.description.abstractBACKGROUNDThis study examined the relationship between service user-rated personal recovery and clinician-rated and service user-rated clinical recovery. The relationships between different subdomains of clinical recovery and personal recovery were also assessed.METHODSIn total, 318 mental health service users with a psychosis diagnosis and their clinicians from 39 sites across Norway completed standardized questionnaires regarding personal recovery, clinical symptoms and psychosocial functioning. Regression models were used to investigate the relationship between personal and clinical recovery.RESULTSOverall, clinical recovery was positively associated with personal recovery, when rated both by service users and by clinicians. Personal recovery was associated with lower levels of depression, self-harm and problems with relationships when rated by the service users. Among the subdomains rated by the clinicians, personal recovery was associated with fewer problems with relationships and higher aggressiveness.CONCLUSIONSThese findings suggest that affective symptoms are associated with personal recovery, indicating the need for greater focus on depression treatment among people with psychosis. Improving social connections is of importance for personal recovery, and might be an area where clinicians and service users can meet and find agreement on important treatment goals.en_US
rioxxterms.funder.project94a427429a5bcfef7dd04c33360d80cden_US


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