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dc.contributor.authorPeet, Debbie
dc.date.accessioned2022-02-01T11:40:16Z
dc.date.available2022-02-01T11:40:16Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.citationAinsbury, E. A., Eakins, J., Güçlü, İ., Kırbaşoğlu, Ç., Peet, D., & Tosun, I. (2020). Accidental neutron exposure in a medical setting: a case study. Journal of radiological protection : official journal of the Society for Radiological Protection, 40(4), 10.1088/1361-6498/abc738. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6498/abc738en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12904/15143
dc.description.abstractIn May 2016, a new linear accelerator (Linac) was installed at a hospital oncology department. A team of individuals supervised the installation, including a Radiation Oncologist who acted as an independent observer to the installation, calibration, beam data collection and shielding measurements. In order to ensure the shielding was correct, a licensed representative of the Turkish Atomic Energy Authority carried out formal measurements of the gamma and neutron dose rates at a variety of locations in and around the Linac facility. At 18 MV, the maximum neutron dose rate was 172μSv h-1and the maximum gamma dose rate was approximately 2μSv h-1(ambient dose equivalent in both cases), significantly higher than the expected and local background doses. As the neutron dose rates in particular were so high, it was concluded that the shielding was not sufficient, potentially due to an inadequate design. In order to rule out overexposure during the installation, biological dosimetry was carried out for a number of the individuals involved. The estimated doses were closely aligned with the doses measured using commercially available neutron dosemeters and were also within the tolerance dose ranges estimated using Monte Carlo simulations, which also supported the investigation. The results underline the need for careful planning before and after installation of new radiation exposure facilities, especially high MV Linac operation for which photo-neutrons might need to be mitigated. The results clearly indicate the importance of such checks, in addition to demonstrating the relevance of biological dosimetry supported by modelling strategies complex or unclear exposure scenarios.
dc.description.urihttps://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/1361-6498/abc738en_US
dc.subjectMonte Carlo modellingen_US
dc.subjectbiological dosimetryen_US
dc.subjectgammaen_US
dc.subjectmedical physicsen_US
dc.subjectneutronen_US
dc.titleAccidental neutron exposure in a medical setting: a case studyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
rioxxterms.funderDefault funderen_US
rioxxterms.identifier.projectDefault projecten_US
rioxxterms.versionNAen_US
rioxxterms.versionofrecordhttps://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6498/abc738en_US
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen_US
refterms.panelUnspecifieden_US
refterms.dateFirstOnline2020
html.description.abstractIn May 2016, a new linear accelerator (Linac) was installed at a hospital oncology department. A team of individuals supervised the installation, including a Radiation Oncologist who acted as an independent observer to the installation, calibration, beam data collection and shielding measurements. In order to ensure the shielding was correct, a licensed representative of the Turkish Atomic Energy Authority carried out formal measurements of the gamma and neutron dose rates at a variety of locations in and around the Linac facility. At 18 MV, the maximum neutron dose rate was 172μSv h-1and the maximum gamma dose rate was approximately 2μSv h-1(ambient dose equivalent in both cases), significantly higher than the expected and local background doses. As the neutron dose rates in particular were so high, it was concluded that the shielding was not sufficient, potentially due to an inadequate design. In order to rule out overexposure during the installation, biological dosimetry was carried out for a number of the individuals involved. The estimated doses were closely aligned with the doses measured using commercially available neutron dosemeters and were also within the tolerance dose ranges estimated using Monte Carlo simulations, which also supported the investigation. The results underline the need for careful planning before and after installation of new radiation exposure facilities, especially high MV Linac operation for which photo-neutrons might need to be mitigated. The results clearly indicate the importance of such checks, in addition to demonstrating the relevance of biological dosimetry supported by modelling strategies complex or unclear exposure scenarios.en_US
rioxxterms.funder.project94a427429a5bcfef7dd04c33360d80cden_US


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