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dc.contributor.authorChaplin, Tara
dc.date.accessioned2022-02-03T15:58:20Z
dc.date.available2022-02-03T15:58:20Z
dc.date.issued2020-11
dc.identifier.citationChaplin T, McLuskey J. What influences nurses' decision to mobilise the critically ill patient? Nurs Crit Care. 2020 Nov;25(6):353-359en_US
dc.identifier.other10.1111/nicc.12464
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12904/15160
dc.description.abstractBackground: Despite the known benefits of mobilising critically ill patients, bed rest is still a common practice in intensive care units. The reasons for this are not fully understood. Early mobilisation can reduce the length of stay in the intensive care unit and in hospitals as well. However, the decision to mobilise a patient can be delayed while health professionals decide whose role it is to implement it. Aim and objectives: The aim of this study was to explore the ways in which nurses make decisions to mobilise critically ill patients and what factors influence the decision-making process. Study design and method: This was a qualitative study involving semi-structured interviews with 12 critical care nurses at a large urban district hospital. Interpretative phenomenological analysis was used to analyse verbatim transcripts of the interviews. Results: The findings demonstrated inconsistencies in the nurses' knowledge of the benefits to mobilising patients and that mobilisation was deemed to be a low priority. Decision-making was influenced by time constraints, staffing levels, and unit demands. A lack of communication and collaborative working was identified, along with uncertainty and role ambiguity, with regard to who decides to mobilise a patient. Mobilisation was found to be complicated by existing cultural influences and by previous experiences of complex mobilisation. Conclusion: Re-education strategies are needed to re-enforce the benefits of mobilisation, along with multidisciplinary training sessions to clarify roles and overcome collaborative working issues. Relevance to clinical practice: This study has provided a greater understanding of the influencing factors on nurses' decision-making with regard to mobilising critical ill patients.
dc.subjectCritical careen_US
dc.subjectCritically illen_US
dc.subjectMobilisationen_US
dc.subjectNurses' experiencesen_US
dc.titleWhat influences nurses' decision to mobilise the critically ill patient?en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
rioxxterms.funderDefault funderen_US
rioxxterms.identifier.projectDefault projecten_US
rioxxterms.versionNAen_US
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen_US
refterms.panelUnspecifieden_US
refterms.dateFirstOnline2019-07
html.description.abstractBackground: Despite the known benefits of mobilising critically ill patients, bed rest is still a common practice in intensive care units. The reasons for this are not fully understood. Early mobilisation can reduce the length of stay in the intensive care unit and in hospitals as well. However, the decision to mobilise a patient can be delayed while health professionals decide whose role it is to implement it. Aim and objectives: The aim of this study was to explore the ways in which nurses make decisions to mobilise critically ill patients and what factors influence the decision-making process. Study design and method: This was a qualitative study involving semi-structured interviews with 12 critical care nurses at a large urban district hospital. Interpretative phenomenological analysis was used to analyse verbatim transcripts of the interviews. Results: The findings demonstrated inconsistencies in the nurses' knowledge of the benefits to mobilising patients and that mobilisation was deemed to be a low priority. Decision-making was influenced by time constraints, staffing levels, and unit demands. A lack of communication and collaborative working was identified, along with uncertainty and role ambiguity, with regard to who decides to mobilise a patient. Mobilisation was found to be complicated by existing cultural influences and by previous experiences of complex mobilisation. Conclusion: Re-education strategies are needed to re-enforce the benefits of mobilisation, along with multidisciplinary training sessions to clarify roles and overcome collaborative working issues. Relevance to clinical practice: This study has provided a greater understanding of the influencing factors on nurses' decision-making with regard to mobilising critical ill patients.en_US
rioxxterms.funder.project94a427429a5bcfef7dd04c33360d80cden_US


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