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dc.contributor.authorDavies, Melanie
dc.contributor.authorSuzuki, Toru
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Alice
dc.date.accessioned2022-02-08T13:15:00Z
dc.date.available2022-02-08T13:15:00Z
dc.date.issued2021-07-01
dc.identifier.citationArgyridou, S., Davies, M. J., Biddle, G., Bernieh, D., Suzuki, T., Dawkins, N. P., Rowlands, A. V., Khunti, K., Smith, A. C., & Yates, T. (2021). Evaluation of an 8-Week Vegan Diet on Plasma Trimethylamine-N-Oxide and Postchallenge Glucose in Adults with Dysglycemia or Obesity. The Journal of nutrition, 151(7), 1844–1853.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1541-6100
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12904/15184
dc.description.abstractBackground: Trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO), a metabolite generated by the gut in response (in part) to meat consumption, is linked to poor cardiometabolic health. Objectives: We investigate the effect of an 8-week vegan diet, followed by a 4-week period of unrestricted diet, on glucose tolerance and plasma TMAO in human omnivores with obesity or dysglycemia. Methods: This interventional single-group prospective trial involved 23 regular meat eaters with dysglycemia [glycated hemoglobin ≥ 5.7% and ≤8% (39-64 mmol/mol)], or obesity (ΒΜΙ ≥ 30 kg/m2) aged 57.8 ± 10.0 years. Participants [14 men (60.9%) and 9 women (39.1%)] were supported in following a vegan diet for 8 weeks, followed by 4 weeks of unrestricted diet. The primary outcomes (plasma TMAO and glucose) were assessed at baseline, during the vegan diet (weeks 1 and 8), and after the unrestricted diet period (week 12). TMAO was assessed after fasting and glucose was measured as a time-averaged total AUC using a 180-minute oral-glucose-tolerance test. Generalized estimating equation models with an exchangeable correlation structure were used to assess changes from baseline, adjusting for age, sex, ethnicity, and weight. Results: TMAO levels (marginal mean) were reduced after weeks 1 and 8 of a vegan diet compared to baseline, from 10.7 (97.5% CI, 6.61-17.3) μmol/L to 5.66 (97.5% CI, 4.56-7.02) μmol/L and 6.38 (97.5% CI, 5.25-7.74) μmol/L, respectively; however, levels rebounded at week 12 after resumption of an unrestricted diet (17.5 μmol/L; 97.5% CI, 7.98-38.4). Postprandial glucose levels (marginal means) were reduced after weeks 1 and 8 compared to baseline, from 8.07 (97.5% CI, 7.24-8.90) mmol/L to 7.14 (97.5% CI, 6.30-7.98) mmol/L and 7.34 (97.5% CI, 6.63-8.04) mmol/L, respectively. Results for glucose and TMAO were independent of weight loss. Improvements in the lipid profile and markers of renal function were observed at week 8. Conclusions: These findings suggest that a vegan diet is an effective strategy for improving glucose tolerance and reducing plasma TMAO in individuals with dysglycemia or obesity. This study was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT03315988.
dc.description.urihttps://doi.org/10.1093/jn/nxab046en_US
dc.publisherOxford University Pressen_US
dc.subjectmetabolitesen_US
dc.subjecttrimethylamine-N-oxideen_US
dc.subjectType 2 diabetesen_US
dc.subjectvegan dieten_US
dc.titleEvaluation of an 8-Week vegan diet on plasma trimethylamine-N-oxide and postchallenge glucose in adults with dysglycemia or obesityen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
rioxxterms.funderDefault funderen_US
rioxxterms.identifier.projectDefault projecten_US
rioxxterms.versionNAen_US
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1093/jn/nxab046en_US
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen_US
refterms.panelUnspecifieden_US
refterms.dateFirstOnline2021-03-30
html.description.abstractBackground: Trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO), a metabolite generated by the gut in response (in part) to meat consumption, is linked to poor cardiometabolic health. Objectives: We investigate the effect of an 8-week vegan diet, followed by a 4-week period of unrestricted diet, on glucose tolerance and plasma TMAO in human omnivores with obesity or dysglycemia. Methods: This interventional single-group prospective trial involved 23 regular meat eaters with dysglycemia [glycated hemoglobin ≥ 5.7% and ≤8% (39-64 mmol/mol)], or obesity (ΒΜΙ ≥ 30 kg/m2) aged 57.8 ± 10.0 years. Participants [14 men (60.9%) and 9 women (39.1%)] were supported in following a vegan diet for 8 weeks, followed by 4 weeks of unrestricted diet. The primary outcomes (plasma TMAO and glucose) were assessed at baseline, during the vegan diet (weeks 1 and 8), and after the unrestricted diet period (week 12). TMAO was assessed after fasting and glucose was measured as a time-averaged total AUC using a 180-minute oral-glucose-tolerance test. Generalized estimating equation models with an exchangeable correlation structure were used to assess changes from baseline, adjusting for age, sex, ethnicity, and weight. Results: TMAO levels (marginal mean) were reduced after weeks 1 and 8 of a vegan diet compared to baseline, from 10.7 (97.5% CI, 6.61-17.3) μmol/L to 5.66 (97.5% CI, 4.56-7.02) μmol/L and 6.38 (97.5% CI, 5.25-7.74) μmol/L, respectively; however, levels rebounded at week 12 after resumption of an unrestricted diet (17.5 μmol/L; 97.5% CI, 7.98-38.4). Postprandial glucose levels (marginal means) were reduced after weeks 1 and 8 compared to baseline, from 8.07 (97.5% CI, 7.24-8.90) mmol/L to 7.14 (97.5% CI, 6.30-7.98) mmol/L and 7.34 (97.5% CI, 6.63-8.04) mmol/L, respectively. Results for glucose and TMAO were independent of weight loss. Improvements in the lipid profile and markers of renal function were observed at week 8. Conclusions: These findings suggest that a vegan diet is an effective strategy for improving glucose tolerance and reducing plasma TMAO in individuals with dysglycemia or obesity. This study was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT03315988.en_US
rioxxterms.funder.project94a427429a5bcfef7dd04c33360d80cden_US


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