Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorJones, Petra
dc.contributor.authorDavies, Melanie
dc.contributor.authorWebb, David
dc.date.accessioned2022-02-08T14:04:02Z
dc.date.available2022-02-08T14:04:02Z
dc.date.issued2021-03
dc.identifier.citationJones, P., Davies, M. J., Khunti, K., Fong, D., & Webb, D. (2021). In-shoe pressure thresholds for people with diabetes and neuropathy at risk of ulceration: A systematic review. Journal of diabetes and its complications, 35(3), 107815.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1873-460X
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12904/15185
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: In-shoe pressure thresholds play an increasingly important role in the prevention of diabetes-related foot ulceration (DFU). The evidence of their effectiveness, methodological consistency and scope for refinement are the subject of this review. Methods: 1107 records were identified (after duplicate removal) based on a search of five databases for studies which applied a specific in-shoe pressure threshold to reduce the risk of ulceration. 37 full text studies were assessed for eligibility of which 21 were included. Results: Five in-shoe pressure thresholds were identified, which are employed to reduce the risk of diabetes-related foot ulceration: a mean peak pressure threshold of 200 kPa used in conjunction with a 25% baseline reduction target; a sustained pressure threshold of 35 mm Hg, a threshold matrix based on risk, shoe size and foot region, and a 40-80% baseline pressure reduction target. The effectiveness of the latter two thresholds have not been assessed yet and the evidence for the effectiveness of the other in-shoe pressure thresholds is limited, based only on two RCTs and two cohort studies. Conclusions: The heterogeneity of current measures precludes meta-analysis and further research and methodological standardisation is required to facilitate ready comparison and the further development of these pressure thresholds.
dc.description.urihttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.jdiacomp.2020.107815en_US
dc.publisherElsevier Incen_US
dc.subjectDiabetesen_US
dc.subjectFooten_US
dc.subjectIn-shoeen_US
dc.subjectNeuropathyen_US
dc.subjectPressureen_US
dc.subjectThresholden_US
dc.titleIn-shoe pressure thresholds for people with diabetes and neuropathy at risk of ulceration: A systematic reviewen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
rioxxterms.funderDefault funderen_US
rioxxterms.identifier.projectDefault projecten_US
rioxxterms.versionNAen_US
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1016/j.jdiacomp.2020.107815en_US
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen_US
refterms.panelUnspecifieden_US
refterms.dateFirstOnline2020-11-26
html.description.abstractIntroduction: In-shoe pressure thresholds play an increasingly important role in the prevention of diabetes-related foot ulceration (DFU). The evidence of their effectiveness, methodological consistency and scope for refinement are the subject of this review. Methods: 1107 records were identified (after duplicate removal) based on a search of five databases for studies which applied a specific in-shoe pressure threshold to reduce the risk of ulceration. 37 full text studies were assessed for eligibility of which 21 were included. Results: Five in-shoe pressure thresholds were identified, which are employed to reduce the risk of diabetes-related foot ulceration: a mean peak pressure threshold of 200 kPa used in conjunction with a 25% baseline reduction target; a sustained pressure threshold of 35 mm Hg, a threshold matrix based on risk, shoe size and foot region, and a 40-80% baseline pressure reduction target. The effectiveness of the latter two thresholds have not been assessed yet and the evidence for the effectiveness of the other in-shoe pressure thresholds is limited, based only on two RCTs and two cohort studies. Conclusions: The heterogeneity of current measures precludes meta-analysis and further research and methodological standardisation is required to facilitate ready comparison and the further development of these pressure thresholds.en_US
rioxxterms.funder.project94a427429a5bcfef7dd04c33360d80cden_US


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record