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dc.contributor.authorBurke, Lynsey
dc.contributor.authorWest, Kevin
dc.contributor.authorHowells, Lynne
dc.contributor.authorThomas, Anne
dc.date.accessioned2022-03-09T14:56:34Z
dc.date.available2022-03-09T14:56:34Z
dc.date.issued2022
dc.identifier.citationAlaqbi, S. S., Burke, L., Guterman, I., Green, C., West, K., Palacios-Gallego, R., Cai, H., Alexandrou, C., Myint, N., Parrott, E., Howells, L. M., Higgins, J. A., Jones, D., Singh, R., Britton, R. G., Tufarelli, C., Thomas, A., & Rufini, A. (2022). Increased mitochondrial proline metabolism sustains proliferation and survival of colorectal cancer cells. PloS one, 17(2), e0262364. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0262364en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12904/15222
dc.description.abstractResearch into the metabolism of the non-essential amino acid (NEAA) proline in cancer has gained traction in recent years. The last step in the proline biosynthesis pathway is catalyzed by pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase (PYCR) enzymes. There are three PYCR enzymes: mitochondrial PYCR1 and 2 and cytosolic PYCR3 encoded by separate genes. The expression of the PYCR1 gene is increased in numerous malignancies and correlates with poor prognosis. PYCR1 expression sustains cancer cells' proliferation and survival and several mechanisms have been implicated to explain its oncogenic role. It has been suggested that the biosynthesis of proline is key to sustain protein synthesis, support mitochondrial function and nucleotide biosynthesis. However, the links between proline metabolism and cancer remain ill-defined and are likely to be tissue specific. Here we use a combination of human dataset, human tissue and mouse models to show that the expression levels of the proline biosynthesis enzymes are significantly increased during colorectal tumorigenesis. Functionally, the expression of mitochondrial PYCRs is necessary for cancer cells' survival and proliferation. However, the phenotypic consequences of PYCRs depletion could not be rescued by external supplementation with either proline or nucleotides. Overall, our data suggest that, despite the mechanisms underlying the role of proline metabolism in colorectal tumorigenesis remain elusive, targeting the proline biosynthesis pathway is a suitable approach for the development of novel anti-cancer therapies.
dc.description.urihttps://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0262364en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectcolorectal canceren_US
dc.subjectproline metabolismen_US
dc.titleIncreased mitochondrial proline metabolism sustains proliferation and survival of colorectal cancer cellsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
rioxxterms.funderDefault funderen_US
rioxxterms.identifier.projectDefault projecten_US
rioxxterms.versionNAen_US
rioxxterms.versionofrecordhttps://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0262364en_US
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen_US
refterms.panelUnspecifieden_US
refterms.dateFirstOnline2022
html.description.abstractResearch into the metabolism of the non-essential amino acid (NEAA) proline in cancer has gained traction in recent years. The last step in the proline biosynthesis pathway is catalyzed by pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase (PYCR) enzymes. There are three PYCR enzymes: mitochondrial PYCR1 and 2 and cytosolic PYCR3 encoded by separate genes. The expression of the PYCR1 gene is increased in numerous malignancies and correlates with poor prognosis. PYCR1 expression sustains cancer cells' proliferation and survival and several mechanisms have been implicated to explain its oncogenic role. It has been suggested that the biosynthesis of proline is key to sustain protein synthesis, support mitochondrial function and nucleotide biosynthesis. However, the links between proline metabolism and cancer remain ill-defined and are likely to be tissue specific. Here we use a combination of human dataset, human tissue and mouse models to show that the expression levels of the proline biosynthesis enzymes are significantly increased during colorectal tumorigenesis. Functionally, the expression of mitochondrial PYCRs is necessary for cancer cells' survival and proliferation. However, the phenotypic consequences of PYCRs depletion could not be rescued by external supplementation with either proline or nucleotides. Overall, our data suggest that, despite the mechanisms underlying the role of proline metabolism in colorectal tumorigenesis remain elusive, targeting the proline biosynthesis pathway is a suitable approach for the development of novel anti-cancer therapies.en_US
rioxxterms.funder.project94a427429a5bcfef7dd04c33360d80cden_US


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