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dc.contributor.authorMoss, Esther
dc.date.accessioned2022-03-11T09:52:25Z
dc.date.available2022-03-11T09:52:25Z
dc.date.issued2022
dc.identifier.citationMillet, N., Moss, E. L., Munir, F., Rogers, E., & McDermott, H. J. (2022). A qualitative exploration of physical and psychosocial well-being in the short and long term after treatments for cervical cancer. European journal of cancer care, 31(2), e13560. https://doi.org/10.1111/ecc.13560en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12904/15241
dc.description.abstractObjective: Cervical cancer is predominantly a cancer of younger women, and improvements in oncological outcomes have led to an increase in cervical cancer survivors living with the long-term effects of treatment. Understanding the recovery process after treatment is essential to increase awareness of the short- and long-term needs of survivors. The aim of this study was to qualitatively explore the recovery process and return to daily activity of cervical cancers survivors from a biopsychosocial perspective. Methods: Participants were 21 women treated for cervical cancer between the ages of 18 and 60 years, living in the United Kingdom. Interviews were undertaken face to face and via the telephone using a semi-structured interview schedule. Results: Data analysis revealed themes which represented participants' experience and perceptions of treatment as a paradox; emotional needs after treatment; and a journey of adversarial growth. A key finding from this analysis was the nuanced experiences between treatment modalities, with physical changes perceived to be more disruptive following radical treatments, whilst psychological repercussions were significant regardless of treatment type. Conclusion: This study provides novel insight into the varied recovery experiences of those treated with surgery and/or chemoradiotherapy for cervical cancer, which can be used to improve the survivorship experience.
dc.description.urihttps://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/ecc.13560en_US
dc.subjectcervical canceren_US
dc.subjectquality of lifeen_US
dc.subjectrecoveryen_US
dc.subjectsurvivorshipen_US
dc.titleA qualitative exploration of physical and psychosocial well-being in the short and long term after treatments for cervical canceren_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
rioxxterms.funderDefault funderen_US
rioxxterms.identifier.projectDefault projecten_US
rioxxterms.versionNAen_US
rioxxterms.versionofrecordhttps://doi.org/10.1111/ecc.13560en_US
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen_US
refterms.panelUnspecifieden_US
refterms.dateFirstOnline2022
html.description.abstractObjective: Cervical cancer is predominantly a cancer of younger women, and improvements in oncological outcomes have led to an increase in cervical cancer survivors living with the long-term effects of treatment. Understanding the recovery process after treatment is essential to increase awareness of the short- and long-term needs of survivors. The aim of this study was to qualitatively explore the recovery process and return to daily activity of cervical cancers survivors from a biopsychosocial perspective. Methods: Participants were 21 women treated for cervical cancer between the ages of 18 and 60 years, living in the United Kingdom. Interviews were undertaken face to face and via the telephone using a semi-structured interview schedule. Results: Data analysis revealed themes which represented participants' experience and perceptions of treatment as a paradox; emotional needs after treatment; and a journey of adversarial growth. A key finding from this analysis was the nuanced experiences between treatment modalities, with physical changes perceived to be more disruptive following radical treatments, whilst psychological repercussions were significant regardless of treatment type. Conclusion: This study provides novel insight into the varied recovery experiences of those treated with surgery and/or chemoradiotherapy for cervical cancer, which can be used to improve the survivorship experience.en_US
rioxxterms.funder.project94a427429a5bcfef7dd04c33360d80cden_US


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