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dc.contributor.authorBu'Lock, Frances
dc.date.accessioned2022-03-15T10:28:06Z
dc.date.available2022-03-15T10:28:06Z
dc.date.issued2022
dc.identifier.citationMcMahon, C. J., Tretter, J. T., Redington, A. N., Bu'Lock, F., Zühlke, L., Heying, R., Mattos, S., Krishna Kumar, R., Jacobs, J. P., & Windram, J. D. (2022). Medical education and training within congenital cardiology: current global status and future directions in a post COVID-19 world. Cardiology in the young, 32(2), 185–197. https://doi.org/10.1017/S1047951121001645en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12904/15250
dc.description.abstractDespite enormous strides in our field with respect to patient care, there has been surprisingly limited dialogue on how to train and educate the next generation of congenital cardiologists. This paper reviews the current status of training and evolving developments in medical education pertinent to congenital cardiology. The adoption of competency-based medical education has been lauded as a robust framework for contemporary medical education over the last two decades. However, inconsistencies in frameworks across different jurisdictions remain, and bridging gaps between competency frameworks and clinical practice has proved challenging. Entrustable professional activities have been proposed as a solution, but integration of such activities into busy clinical cardiology practices will present its own challenges. Consequently, this pivot towards a more structured approach to medical education necessitates the widespread availability of appropriately trained medical educationalists, a development that will better inform curriculum development, instructional design, and assessment. Differentiation between superficial and deep learning, the vital role of rich formative feedback and coaching, should guide our trainees to become self-regulated learners, capable of critical reasoning yet retaining an awareness of uncertainty and ambiguity. Furthermore, disruptive innovations such as "technology enhanced learning" may be leveraged to improve education, especially for trainees from low- and middle-income countries. Each of these initiatives will require resources, widespread advocacy and raised awareness, and publication of supporting data, and so it is especially gratifying that Cardiology in the Young has fostered a progressive approach, agreeing to publish one or two articles in each journal issue in this domain.
dc.description.urihttps://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/cardiology-in-the-young/article/medical-education-and-training-within-congenital-cardiology-current-global-status-and-future-directions-in-a-post-covid19-world/313748C65C76149FCAC07CCB2810449Cen_US
dc.subjectadult congenital heart diseaseen_US
dc.subjectcongenital cardiologyen_US
dc.subjectcongenital heart diseaseen_US
dc.subjecteducationen_US
dc.subjectpaediatric cardiologyen_US
dc.subjecttrainingen_US
dc.titleMedical education and training within congenital cardiology: current global status and future directions in a post COVID-19 worlden_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
rioxxterms.funderDefault funderen_US
rioxxterms.identifier.projectDefault projecten_US
rioxxterms.versionNAen_US
rioxxterms.versionofrecordhttps://doi.org/10.1017/S1047951121001645en_US
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen_US
refterms.panelUnspecifieden_US
html.description.abstractDespite enormous strides in our field with respect to patient care, there has been surprisingly limited dialogue on how to train and educate the next generation of congenital cardiologists. This paper reviews the current status of training and evolving developments in medical education pertinent to congenital cardiology. The adoption of competency-based medical education has been lauded as a robust framework for contemporary medical education over the last two decades. However, inconsistencies in frameworks across different jurisdictions remain, and bridging gaps between competency frameworks and clinical practice has proved challenging. Entrustable professional activities have been proposed as a solution, but integration of such activities into busy clinical cardiology practices will present its own challenges. Consequently, this pivot towards a more structured approach to medical education necessitates the widespread availability of appropriately trained medical educationalists, a development that will better inform curriculum development, instructional design, and assessment. Differentiation between superficial and deep learning, the vital role of rich formative feedback and coaching, should guide our trainees to become self-regulated learners, capable of critical reasoning yet retaining an awareness of uncertainty and ambiguity. Furthermore, disruptive innovations such as "technology enhanced learning" may be leveraged to improve education, especially for trainees from low- and middle-income countries. Each of these initiatives will require resources, widespread advocacy and raised awareness, and publication of supporting data, and so it is especially gratifying that Cardiology in the Young has fostered a progressive approach, agreeing to publish one or two articles in each journal issue in this domain.en_US
rioxxterms.funder.project94a427429a5bcfef7dd04c33360d80cden_US


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