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dc.contributor.authorGraham-Brown, Matthew
dc.contributor.authorCarr, Sue
dc.date.accessioned2022-03-15T14:32:43Z
dc.date.available2022-03-15T14:32:43Z
dc.date.issued2022
dc.identifier.citationBeckwith, H., Selimi, V., Mussad, A., Graham-Brown, M., Knapton, A., Irish, B., & Carr, S. (2022). Demographics, distribution and experiences of UK clinical academic trainees using GMC NTS Survey data. Postgraduate medical journal, postgradmedj-2021-141278. Advance online publication. https://doi.org/10.1136/postgradmedj-2021-141278en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12904/15261
dc.description.abstractInvolvement in research plays an integral role in the delivery of high-quality patient care, benefitting doctors, patients and employers. It is important that access to clinical academic training opportunities are inclusive and equitable. To better understand the academic trainee population, distribution of academic posts and their reported experience of clinical training, we analysed 53 477 anonymous responses from General Medical Council databases and the 2019 National Training Survey. Academic trainees are more likely to be men, and the gender divide begins prior to graduation. There are very low numbers of international medical graduates and less than full-time academic trainees. A small number of UK universities produce a greater prevalence of doctors successfully appointed to academic posts; subsequent academic training also clusters around these institutions. At more senior levels, academic trainees are significantly more likely to be of white ethnicity, although among UK graduates, no ethnicity differences were seen. Foundation academic trainees report a poorer experience of some aspects of their clinical training placements, with high workloads reported by all academic trainees. Our work highlights important disparities in the demographics of the UK clinical academic trainee population and raises concerns that certain groups of doctors face barriers accessing and progressing in UK academic training pathways.
dc.description.urihttps://pmj.bmj.com/content/early/2022/02/15/postgradmedj-2021-141278en_US
dc.subjectmedical educationen_US
dc.subjecttrainingen_US
dc.titleDemographics, distribution and experiences of UK clinical academic trainees using GMC NTS Survey dataen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
rioxxterms.funderDefault funderen_US
rioxxterms.identifier.projectDefault projecten_US
rioxxterms.versionNAen_US
rioxxterms.versionofrecordhttps://doi.org/10.1136/postgradmedj-2021-141278en_US
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen_US
refterms.panelUnspecifieden_US
html.description.abstractInvolvement in research plays an integral role in the delivery of high-quality patient care, benefitting doctors, patients and employers. It is important that access to clinical academic training opportunities are inclusive and equitable. To better understand the academic trainee population, distribution of academic posts and their reported experience of clinical training, we analysed 53 477 anonymous responses from General Medical Council databases and the 2019 National Training Survey. Academic trainees are more likely to be men, and the gender divide begins prior to graduation. There are very low numbers of international medical graduates and less than full-time academic trainees. A small number of UK universities produce a greater prevalence of doctors successfully appointed to academic posts; subsequent academic training also clusters around these institutions. At more senior levels, academic trainees are significantly more likely to be of white ethnicity, although among UK graduates, no ethnicity differences were seen. Foundation academic trainees report a poorer experience of some aspects of their clinical training placements, with high workloads reported by all academic trainees. Our work highlights important disparities in the demographics of the UK clinical academic trainee population and raises concerns that certain groups of doctors face barriers accessing and progressing in UK academic training pathways.en_US
rioxxterms.funder.project94a427429a5bcfef7dd04c33360d80cden_US


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