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dc.contributor.authorYang, Bin
dc.date.accessioned2022-03-15T16:22:52Z
dc.date.available2022-03-15T16:22:52Z
dc.date.issued2022
dc.identifier.citationWang, W., Sai, W. L., & Yang, B. (2022). Sheng li xue bao : [Acta physiologica Sinica], 74(1), 28–38.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12904/15268
dc.description.abstractAcute kidney injury (AKI) is a common critical clinical disease characterized by a sharp decline of renal function. Ischemia-reperfusion (IR) is one of the main causes of AKI. The mortality of AKI remains high due to the lack of early diagnosis and cause specific treatment. IR rapidly initiates innate immune responses, activates complement and innate immune cells, releasing a large number of injury-related molecules such as high mobility group box-1 (HMGB1), inflammatory mediators such as caspase-3, and then recruits immune inflammatory cells including M1 macrophages (Mϕ) to the microenvironment of injury, causing apoptosis and necrosis of renal tubular epithelial cells (TECs). Dead cells and associated inflammation further activate the adaptive immune system, which not only aggravates tissue damage, but also initiates M2 Mϕ participated inflammatory clearance, tissue repair and regeneration. Mϕ, professional phagocytes, and TECs, semi-professional phagocytes, can phagocytose around damaged cells including apoptotic Mϕ and TECs, which are key innate immune cells to regulate the outcome of injury, repair or fibrosis. In recent years, it has been found that erythropoietin (EPO) not only binds to the homodimeric receptor (EPOR)2 to induce erythropoiesis, but also binds to the heterodimeric receptor EPOR/βcR, also known as innate repair receptor, which plays renoprotective roles. Properdin is the only positive regulator in the complement activation of alternative pathway. It also can effectively identify and bind to early apoptotic T cells and facilitate phagocytic clearing by Mϕ through a non-complement activation-dependent mechanism. Our previous studies have shown that Mϕ and TECs associated with EPO and its receptors and properdin are involved in IR injury and repair, but the underlying mechanism needs to be further explored. As an important carrier of cell-to-cell signal transmission, exosomes participate in the occurrence and development of a variety of renal diseases. The role of exosomes involved in the interaction between Mϕ and TECs in IR-induced AKI is not fully defined. Based on the available results in the role of Mϕ and TECs in renal IR-induced AKI, this review discussed the role of Mϕ polarization and interaction with TECs in renal IR injury, as well as the participation of EPO and its receptors, properdin and exosomes.
dc.language.isozhen_US
dc.subjectacute kidney injuryen_US
dc.subjectischemia-reperfusionen_US
dc.subjectmacrophage polarizationen_US
dc.titleThe role of macrophage polarization and interaction with renal tubular epithelial cells in ischemia-reperfusion induced acute kidney injuryen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
rioxxterms.funderDefault funderen_US
rioxxterms.identifier.projectDefault projecten_US
rioxxterms.versionNAen_US
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen_US
refterms.panelUnspecifieden_US
html.description.abstractAcute kidney injury (AKI) is a common critical clinical disease characterized by a sharp decline of renal function. Ischemia-reperfusion (IR) is one of the main causes of AKI. The mortality of AKI remains high due to the lack of early diagnosis and cause specific treatment. IR rapidly initiates innate immune responses, activates complement and innate immune cells, releasing a large number of injury-related molecules such as high mobility group box-1 (HMGB1), inflammatory mediators such as caspase-3, and then recruits immune inflammatory cells including M1 macrophages (Mϕ) to the microenvironment of injury, causing apoptosis and necrosis of renal tubular epithelial cells (TECs). Dead cells and associated inflammation further activate the adaptive immune system, which not only aggravates tissue damage, but also initiates M2 Mϕ participated inflammatory clearance, tissue repair and regeneration. Mϕ, professional phagocytes, and TECs, semi-professional phagocytes, can phagocytose around damaged cells including apoptotic Mϕ and TECs, which are key innate immune cells to regulate the outcome of injury, repair or fibrosis. In recent years, it has been found that erythropoietin (EPO) not only binds to the homodimeric receptor (EPOR)2 to induce erythropoiesis, but also binds to the heterodimeric receptor EPOR/βcR, also known as innate repair receptor, which plays renoprotective roles. Properdin is the only positive regulator in the complement activation of alternative pathway. It also can effectively identify and bind to early apoptotic T cells and facilitate phagocytic clearing by Mϕ through a non-complement activation-dependent mechanism. Our previous studies have shown that Mϕ and TECs associated with EPO and its receptors and properdin are involved in IR injury and repair, but the underlying mechanism needs to be further explored. As an important carrier of cell-to-cell signal transmission, exosomes participate in the occurrence and development of a variety of renal diseases. The role of exosomes involved in the interaction between Mϕ and TECs in IR-induced AKI is not fully defined. Based on the available results in the role of Mϕ and TECs in renal IR-induced AKI, this review discussed the role of Mϕ polarization and interaction with TECs in renal IR injury, as well as the participation of EPO and its receptors, properdin and exosomes.en_US
rioxxterms.funder.project94a427429a5bcfef7dd04c33360d80cden_US


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