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dc.contributor.authorRennick-Egglestone, Stefan
dc.date.accessioned2022-04-05T07:47:52Z
dc.date.available2022-04-05T07:47:52Z
dc.date.issued2022
dc.identifier.citationEvans, K., Donelan, J., Rennick-Egglestone, S., Cox, S. & Kuipers, Y. (2022). Review of mobile apps for women with anxiety in pregnancy: Maternity care professionals' guide to locating and assessing anxiety apps. Journal of Medical Internet Research, 24(3), pp.e31831.en_US
dc.identifier.other10.2196/31831
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12904/15326
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUNDMental health and pregnancy apps are widely available and have the potential to improve health outcomes and enhance women's experience of pregnancy. Women frequently access digital information throughout their pregnancy. However, health care providers and women have little information to guide them toward potentially helpful or effective apps.OBJECTIVEThis review aimed to evaluate a methodology for systematically searching and reviewing commercially available apps that support pregnant women with symptoms of anxiety in order to assist maternity care professionals in identifying resources that they could recommend for these women.METHODSA stepwise systematic approach was used to identify, select, describe, and assess the most popular and highly user-rated apps available in the United Kingdom from January to March 2021. This included developing a script-based search strategy and search process, writing evaluation criteria, and conducting a narrative description and evaluation of the selected apps.RESULTSUseful search terms were identified, which included nonclinical, aspirational, and problem-based phrases. There were 39 apps selected for inclusion in the review. No apps specifically targeted women with anxiety in pregnancy. Of the 39 apps included in the review, 33 (85%) focused solely on mind-body techniques to promote relaxation, stress reduction, and psychological well-being. Only 8 of the 39 (21%) apps included in the review reported that health care professionals had contributed to app development and only 1/39 (3%) provided empirical evidence on the effectiveness and acceptability of the app. The top 12/39 (31%) apps were evaluated by 2 independent reviewers using the developed criteria and scores. There was a small negative correlation between the reviewers' scores and app user rating scores, with higher user rating scores associated with lower reviewer scores.CONCLUSIONSApp developers, publishers, and maternity care professionals should seek advice from women with lived experience of anxiety symptoms in pregnancy to locate, promote, and optimize the visibility of apps for pregnant women. There is a lack of resources that provide coping strategies based on current evidence for the treatment of anxiety in pregnancy. Maternity care providers are limited in their ability to locate and recommend acceptable and trustworthy apps because of the lack of information on the evidence base, development, and testing of apps. Maternity care professionals and women need access to libraries of trusted apps that have been evaluated against relevant and established criteria.
dc.description.urihttps://www.jmir.org/2022/3/e31831en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectAnxietyen_US
dc.subjectMaternal health servicesen_US
dc.subjectMobile applicationsen_US
dc.subjectPregnancyen_US
dc.subjectTelemedicineen_US
dc.titleReview of mobile apps for women with anxiety in pregnancy: Maternity care professionals' guide to locating and assessing anxiety appsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
rioxxterms.funderDefault funderen_US
rioxxterms.identifier.projectDefault projecten_US
rioxxterms.versionNAen_US
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen_US
refterms.panelUnspecifieden_US
refterms.dateFirstOnline2022-03-23
html.description.abstractBACKGROUNDMental health and pregnancy apps are widely available and have the potential to improve health outcomes and enhance women's experience of pregnancy. Women frequently access digital information throughout their pregnancy. However, health care providers and women have little information to guide them toward potentially helpful or effective apps.OBJECTIVEThis review aimed to evaluate a methodology for systematically searching and reviewing commercially available apps that support pregnant women with symptoms of anxiety in order to assist maternity care professionals in identifying resources that they could recommend for these women.METHODSA stepwise systematic approach was used to identify, select, describe, and assess the most popular and highly user-rated apps available in the United Kingdom from January to March 2021. This included developing a script-based search strategy and search process, writing evaluation criteria, and conducting a narrative description and evaluation of the selected apps.RESULTSUseful search terms were identified, which included nonclinical, aspirational, and problem-based phrases. There were 39 apps selected for inclusion in the review. No apps specifically targeted women with anxiety in pregnancy. Of the 39 apps included in the review, 33 (85%) focused solely on mind-body techniques to promote relaxation, stress reduction, and psychological well-being. Only 8 of the 39 (21%) apps included in the review reported that health care professionals had contributed to app development and only 1/39 (3%) provided empirical evidence on the effectiveness and acceptability of the app. The top 12/39 (31%) apps were evaluated by 2 independent reviewers using the developed criteria and scores. There was a small negative correlation between the reviewers' scores and app user rating scores, with higher user rating scores associated with lower reviewer scores.CONCLUSIONSApp developers, publishers, and maternity care professionals should seek advice from women with lived experience of anxiety symptoms in pregnancy to locate, promote, and optimize the visibility of apps for pregnant women. There is a lack of resources that provide coping strategies based on current evidence for the treatment of anxiety in pregnancy. Maternity care providers are limited in their ability to locate and recommend acceptable and trustworthy apps because of the lack of information on the evidence base, development, and testing of apps. Maternity care professionals and women need access to libraries of trusted apps that have been evaluated against relevant and established criteria.en_US
rioxxterms.funder.project94a427429a5bcfef7dd04c33360d80cden_US


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