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dc.contributor.authorWalsh, David A
dc.date.accessioned2022-05-12T14:27:34Z
dc.date.available2022-05-12T14:27:34Z
dc.date.issued2003-12
dc.identifier.citationWalsh, D. A. and Wilson, D. (2003) ‘Post-mortem collection of human joint tissues for research’, Rheumatology, 42(12), pp. 1556–1558en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12904/15432
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: A feasibility study aiming to obtain post-mortem knee joint tissues from 10 donors for research. METHODS: Next of kin were approached by bereavement officers then informed about the project by the study nurse. Written consent was sought to collect bone, cartilage and soft tissue from both knees, and to extract data from medical notes. RESULTS: During the 4-month study period 259 families attended the King’s Mill Hospital Bereavement Centre, 36 of whom met with the study nurse, 10 of whom consented to joint tissue collecting. The process of seeking consent required approximately 1 h of direct contact. Participants often looked to this as an extension of the bereavement counselling process and many expressed gratitude that some good might be derived from the death. Reasons for non-recruitment included operational restraints and relatives’ distress. Donors were more likely to be male (90%) than were non-donors (49%, Z=–2.6, P < 0.01). Coroner’s post-mortem examinations took place on similar proportions of donors (20%) and non-donors (19%, Z=–0.06, P=0.96). CONCLUSIONS: Post-mortem joint tissue collection for research remains feasible in the presence of a skilled, well co-ordinated, multidisciplinary team, even when post-mortem examination would not otherwise be required.
dc.description.urihttps://academic.oup.com/rheumatology/article/42/12/1556/1784877en_US
dc.publisherRheumatologyen_US
dc.subjectPost-mortemen_US
dc.subjectTissuesen_US
dc.subjectEthicsen_US
dc.subjectArthritisen_US
dc.subjectConsenten_US
dc.titlePost mortem collection of human joint tissues for research.en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
rioxxterms.funderDefault funderen_US
rioxxterms.identifier.projectDefault projecten_US
rioxxterms.versionNAen_US
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1093/rheumatology/keg406en_US
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen_US
refterms.dateFOA2022-05-12T14:27:34Z
refterms.panelUnspecifieden_US
html.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: A feasibility study aiming to obtain post-mortem knee joint tissues from 10 donors for research. METHODS: Next of kin were approached by bereavement officers then informed about the project by the study nurse. Written consent was sought to collect bone, cartilage and soft tissue from both knees, and to extract data from medical notes. RESULTS: During the 4-month study period 259 families attended the King’s Mill Hospital Bereavement Centre, 36 of whom met with the study nurse, 10 of whom consented to joint tissue collecting. The process of seeking consent required approximately 1 h of direct contact. Participants often looked to this as an extension of the bereavement counselling process and many expressed gratitude that some good might be derived from the death. Reasons for non-recruitment included operational restraints and relatives’ distress. Donors were more likely to be male (90%) than were non-donors (49%, Z=–2.6, P < 0.01). Coroner’s post-mortem examinations took place on similar proportions of donors (20%) and non-donors (19%, Z=–0.06, P=0.96). CONCLUSIONS: Post-mortem joint tissue collection for research remains feasible in the presence of a skilled, well co-ordinated, multidisciplinary team, even when post-mortem examination would not otherwise be required.en_US
rioxxterms.funder.project94a427429a5bcfef7dd04c33360d80cden_US


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