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dc.contributor.authorWalsh, David A
dc.date.accessioned2022-05-12T14:38:44Z
dc.date.available2022-05-12T14:38:44Z
dc.date.issued2003-07
dc.identifier.citationSeegers, H. C. et al. (2003) ‘Enhancement of Angiogenesis by Endogenous Substance P Release and Neurokinin-1 Receptors During Neurogenic Inflammation’, JOURNAL OF PHARMACOLOGY AND EXPERIMENTAL THERAPEUTICS, 1 January, pp. 8–12en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12904/15434
dc.description.abstractEarly angiogenesis is a key step in the transition from acute to persistent inflammation. The nervous system has long been known to play a role in inflammation, in part through the release of substance P from peripheral nerve terminals (neurogenic inflammation). Application of substance P can stimulate vessel growth in a variety of angiogenesis assays, although it was previously not known whether endogenous substance P released from sensory nerves could modulate angiogenesis. We hypothesized that endogenous substance P can initiate angiogenesis during acute neurogenic inflammation. Here we show that 10 nmol of substance P can stimulate angiogenesis within the rat knee synovium, as shown by increased endothelial cell proliferation index [PCNA index, 19% (95% confidence interval (CI), 17 to 20%)] compared with saline injected knees [6% (95% CI, 4% to 8%), p < 0.05]. Moreover, this was prevented by coadministration of an antagonist of the neurokinin-1 (NK1) subtype of neurokinin receptor SR140333 (nolpitantium), 1 micro mol [8% (95% CI, 5% to 11%)]. Capsaicin 0.5%, which stimulates release of endogenous substance P from sensory nerves, was also found to enhance synovial angiogenesis, [PCNA index 17% (95% CI, 14% to 19%)] compared with saline injected control knees [2% (95% CI, 1% to 3%), p < 0.05], and this also was inhibited by 1 micro mol of SR140333 [11% (95% CI, 8 to 16%)]. Inhibition of capsaicin-enhanced angiogenesis was incomplete, and this may indicate a contribution of other neuropeptides, in addition to substance P-NK1 receptor interactions, in capsaicin-enhanced angiogenesis. NK1 receptor antagonists could have therapeutic potential in conditions where neurogenic angiogenesis contributes to disease.
dc.description.urihttps://jpet.aspetjournals.org/content/306/1/8.longen_US
dc.publisherThe Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeuticsen_US
dc.subjectAngiogenesisen_US
dc.subjectInflammationen_US
dc.titleEnhancement of angiogenesis by endogenous substance P release and neurokinin-1 receptors during neurogenic inflammationen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
rioxxterms.funderDefault funderen_US
rioxxterms.identifier.projectDefault projecten_US
rioxxterms.versionNAen_US
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1124/jpet.103.050013en_US
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen_US
refterms.panelUnspecifieden_US
refterms.dateFirstOnline2003-03
html.description.abstractEarly angiogenesis is a key step in the transition from acute to persistent inflammation. The nervous system has long been known to play a role in inflammation, in part through the release of substance P from peripheral nerve terminals (neurogenic inflammation). Application of substance P can stimulate vessel growth in a variety of angiogenesis assays, although it was previously not known whether endogenous substance P released from sensory nerves could modulate angiogenesis. We hypothesized that endogenous substance P can initiate angiogenesis during acute neurogenic inflammation. Here we show that 10 nmol of substance P can stimulate angiogenesis within the rat knee synovium, as shown by increased endothelial cell proliferation index [PCNA index, 19% (95% confidence interval (CI), 17 to 20%)] compared with saline injected knees [6% (95% CI, 4% to 8%), p < 0.05]. Moreover, this was prevented by coadministration of an antagonist of the neurokinin-1 (NK1) subtype of neurokinin receptor SR140333 (nolpitantium), 1 micro mol [8% (95% CI, 5% to 11%)]. Capsaicin 0.5%, which stimulates release of endogenous substance P from sensory nerves, was also found to enhance synovial angiogenesis, [PCNA index 17% (95% CI, 14% to 19%)] compared with saline injected control knees [2% (95% CI, 1% to 3%), p < 0.05], and this also was inhibited by 1 micro mol of SR140333 [11% (95% CI, 8 to 16%)]. Inhibition of capsaicin-enhanced angiogenesis was incomplete, and this may indicate a contribution of other neuropeptides, in addition to substance P-NK1 receptor interactions, in capsaicin-enhanced angiogenesis. NK1 receptor antagonists could have therapeutic potential in conditions where neurogenic angiogenesis contributes to disease.en_US
rioxxterms.funder.project94a427429a5bcfef7dd04c33360d80cden_US


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