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dc.contributor.authorWalsh, David A
dc.date.accessioned2022-05-31T13:22:39Z
dc.date.available2022-05-31T13:22:39Z
dc.date.issued2012-12
dc.identifier.citationWalsh DA, McWilliams DF. Pain in rheumatoid arthritis. Curr Pain Headache Rep. 2012 Dec;16(6):509-17.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12904/15564
dc.description.abstractRheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an inflammatory disease of synovial joints, and pain is the predominant problem for people with RA. Pain in RA is distressing in its own right and adversely affects disability and psychosocial outcomes. RA pain may be due to joint inflammation and also augmented by central sensitization and structural joint damage. Noninflammatory pain mechanisms may confound the assessment of disease activity in RA, and treatment should aim to both suppress inflammatory disease and relieve pain symptoms. Effective treatment stratification requires a full assessment of pain mechanisms by clinical history and examination, as well as objective assessment of synovitis and joint damage. Biologic therapies and joint replacement surgery have major impacts on RA pain, but may only be available to those with most severe or advanced disease. Holistic approaches to pain management are indicated, including pharmacologic analgesia where randomized controlled trials (RCTs) offer evidence of efficacy.
dc.description.urihttps://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11916-012-0303-xen_US
dc.publisherCurrent Pain and Headache Reportsen_US
dc.subjectRheumatoid arthritis RAen_US
dc.subjectInflammationen_US
dc.subjectPainen_US
dc.titlePain in rheumatoid arthritisen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
rioxxterms.funderDefault funderen_US
rioxxterms.identifier.projectDefault projecten_US
rioxxterms.versionNAen_US
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1007/s11916-012-0303-x.en_US
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen_US
refterms.panelUnspecifieden_US
html.description.abstractRheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an inflammatory disease of synovial joints, and pain is the predominant problem for people with RA. Pain in RA is distressing in its own right and adversely affects disability and psychosocial outcomes. RA pain may be due to joint inflammation and also augmented by central sensitization and structural joint damage. Noninflammatory pain mechanisms may confound the assessment of disease activity in RA, and treatment should aim to both suppress inflammatory disease and relieve pain symptoms. Effective treatment stratification requires a full assessment of pain mechanisms by clinical history and examination, as well as objective assessment of synovitis and joint damage. Biologic therapies and joint replacement surgery have major impacts on RA pain, but may only be available to those with most severe or advanced disease. Holistic approaches to pain management are indicated, including pharmacologic analgesia where randomized controlled trials (RCTs) offer evidence of efficacy.en_US
rioxxterms.funder.project94a427429a5bcfef7dd04c33360d80cden_US


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