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dc.contributor.authorGrafton-Clarke, Ciaran
dc.contributor.authorUraiby, Hussain
dc.contributor.authorAbraham, Shalin
dc.contributor.authorKirtley, Joanne
dc.contributor.authorXu, Gang
dc.contributor.authorMcCarthy, Mark
dc.date.accessioned2022-07-05T14:54:31Z
dc.date.available2022-07-05T14:54:31Z
dc.identifier.citationGrafton-Clarke, C., Uraiby, H., Abraham, S., Kirtley, J., Xu, G., & McCarthy, M. (2022). Live streaming to sustain clinical learning. The clinical teacher, e13488.en_US
dc.identifier.other10.1111/tct.13488
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12904/15629
dc.description.abstractBackground The COVID-19 pandemic has necessitated the need to develop teaching innovations that provide safe, authentic clinical encounters which facilitate experiential learning. In tandem with the dissemination of teleconsultation and online teaching, this pilot study describes, evaluates and justifies a multi-camera live-streaming teaching session to medical students from the clinical environment. Approach Multiple audio and video inputs capturing an outpatient clinic setting were routed through Open Broadcast Software (OBS) to create a customised feed streamed to remote learners through a videoconferencing platform. Sessions were conducted between September 2020 and March 2021. Twelve students sequentially interacted with a patient who held an iPad. Higher quality Go-Pro cameras captured the scene, allowing students to view the consultation from the patient and doctor's perspective. A consultant then conducted a ‘gold standard’ patient consultation observed by students. A faculty member remotely facilitated the session, providing pre-clinic teaching and debriefing. The equipment required with costing for a standard and low-cost version is described, as well as a set-up schematic and overview of ideal conditions and barriers encountered during trials. Evaluation All students completed a post-participation questionnaire, rating the overall quality of the sessions as 9.7/10. The quality of online facilitation, utility of observing peers' and consultant interaction with the patient, opportunity for peer-to-peer learning and availability of multiple camera angles were particularly valued by students. Implications This innovation permits an authentic clinical interaction to be experienced by multiple students remotely, promoting equitable access to high-quality teaching, while maintaining the safety of students and patients.
dc.description.urihttps://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/tct.13488en_US
dc.subjectOnline teachingen_US
dc.subjectVideoconferencingen_US
dc.subjectConsultationen_US
dc.subjectTelemedicineen_US
dc.subjectMedical studentsen_US
dc.titleLive streaming to sustain clinical learningen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
rioxxterms.funderDefault funderen_US
rioxxterms.identifier.projectDefault projecten_US
rioxxterms.versionNAen_US
rioxxterms.versionofrecordhttps://doi.org/10.1111/tct.13488en_US
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen_US
refterms.panelUnspecifieden_US
refterms.dateFirstOnline2022-04-01
html.description.abstractBackground The COVID-19 pandemic has necessitated the need to develop teaching innovations that provide safe, authentic clinical encounters which facilitate experiential learning. In tandem with the dissemination of teleconsultation and online teaching, this pilot study describes, evaluates and justifies a multi-camera live-streaming teaching session to medical students from the clinical environment. Approach Multiple audio and video inputs capturing an outpatient clinic setting were routed through Open Broadcast Software (OBS) to create a customised feed streamed to remote learners through a videoconferencing platform. Sessions were conducted between September 2020 and March 2021. Twelve students sequentially interacted with a patient who held an iPad. Higher quality Go-Pro cameras captured the scene, allowing students to view the consultation from the patient and doctor's perspective. A consultant then conducted a ‘gold standard’ patient consultation observed by students. A faculty member remotely facilitated the session, providing pre-clinic teaching and debriefing. The equipment required with costing for a standard and low-cost version is described, as well as a set-up schematic and overview of ideal conditions and barriers encountered during trials. Evaluation All students completed a post-participation questionnaire, rating the overall quality of the sessions as 9.7/10. The quality of online facilitation, utility of observing peers' and consultant interaction with the patient, opportunity for peer-to-peer learning and availability of multiple camera angles were particularly valued by students. Implications This innovation permits an authentic clinical interaction to be experienced by multiple students remotely, promoting equitable access to high-quality teaching, while maintaining the safety of students and patients.en_US
rioxxterms.funder.project94a427429a5bcfef7dd04c33360d80cden_US


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