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dc.contributor.authorMartin, Christopher
dc.contributor.authorJenkins, David
dc.contributor.authorPatel, Prashanth
dc.contributor.authorGoss, Charles
dc.contributor.authorPrice, Arthur
dc.contributor.authorBarton, Linda
dc.contributor.authorGupta, Pankaj
dc.contributor.authorZaccardi, Francesco
dc.contributor.authorBrunskill, Nigel
dc.contributor.authorHaldar, Pranab
dc.contributor.authorPareek, Manish
dc.date.accessioned2022-07-05T15:31:58Z
dc.date.available2022-07-05T15:31:58Z
dc.identifier.citationMartin, C. A., Jenkins, D. R., Patel, P., Goss, C., Price, A., Barton, L., Gupta, P., Zaccardi, F., Brunskill, N. J., Haldar, P., Khunti, K., & Pareek, M. (2022). No cases of asymptomatic SARS-CoV-2 infection among healthcare staff in a city under lockdown restrictions: lessons to inform 'Operation Moonshot'. Journal of public health (Oxford, England), 44(2), 255–258.en_US
dc.identifier.other10.1093/pubmed/fdaa237
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12904/15632
dc.description.abstractBackground Leicester was the first city in the UK to have ‘local lockdown’ measures imposed in response to high community rates of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) transmission. As part of this response, a directive was issued by NHS England to offer testing of asymptomatic healthcare workers (HCWs) at University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust (UHL) for SARS-CoV-2 infection. Methods Between 20 July and 14 August 2020, we invited all HCWs at UHL to attend for SARS-CoV-2 testing by nucleic acid amplification (NAAT). We combined the result of this assay with demographic information from the electronic staff record. Results A total of 1150 staff (~8% of the workforce) volunteered. The median age was 46 years (IQR 34–55), 972 (84.5%) were female; 234 (20.4%) were of South Asian and 58 (5.0%) of Black ethnicity; 564 (49.0%) were nurses/healthcare assistants. We found no cases of asymptomatic infection. In comparison, average community test positivity rate in Leicester city was 2.6%. Conclusions Within the context of local lockdowns due to high community transmission rates, voluntary testing of asymptomatic staff has low uptake and low yield and thus its premise and cost-effectiveness should be re-considered.
dc.description.urihttps://academic.oup.com/jpubhealth/article/44/2/255/6047809en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectAsymptomaticen_US
dc.subjectCOVID-19en_US
dc.subjectHealthcare workeren_US
dc.subjectLockdownen_US
dc.subjectSARS-CoV-2en_US
dc.titleNo cases of asymptomatic SARS-CoV-2 infection among healthcare staff in a city under lockdown restrictions: lessons to inform 'Operation Moonshot'en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
rioxxterms.funderDefault funderen_US
rioxxterms.identifier.projectDefault projecten_US
rioxxterms.versionNAen_US
rioxxterms.versionofrecordhttps://doi.org/10.1093/pubmed/fdaa237en_US
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen_US
refterms.panelUnspecifieden_US
refterms.dateFirstOnline2022-06-27
html.description.abstractBackground Leicester was the first city in the UK to have ‘local lockdown’ measures imposed in response to high community rates of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) transmission. As part of this response, a directive was issued by NHS England to offer testing of asymptomatic healthcare workers (HCWs) at University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust (UHL) for SARS-CoV-2 infection. Methods Between 20 July and 14 August 2020, we invited all HCWs at UHL to attend for SARS-CoV-2 testing by nucleic acid amplification (NAAT). We combined the result of this assay with demographic information from the electronic staff record. Results A total of 1150 staff (~8% of the workforce) volunteered. The median age was 46 years (IQR 34–55), 972 (84.5%) were female; 234 (20.4%) were of South Asian and 58 (5.0%) of Black ethnicity; 564 (49.0%) were nurses/healthcare assistants. We found no cases of asymptomatic infection. In comparison, average community test positivity rate in Leicester city was 2.6%. Conclusions Within the context of local lockdowns due to high community transmission rates, voluntary testing of asymptomatic staff has low uptake and low yield and thus its premise and cost-effectiveness should be re-considered.en_US
rioxxterms.funder.project94a427429a5bcfef7dd04c33360d80cden_US


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