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dc.contributor.authorRoberts, Samantha
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-02T10:26:00Z
dc.date.available2022-08-02T10:26:00Z
dc.date.issued2022
dc.identifier.citationMitter, P., De Crescenzo, F., Loo Yong Kee, K., Xia, J., Roberts, S., Chi, W., Kurtulumus, A., Kyle, S. D., Geddes, J. R. & Cipriani, A. (2022). Sleep deprivation as a treatment for major depressive episodes: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Sleep Medicine Reviews, 64, pp.101647.en_US
dc.identifier.other10.1016/j.smrv.2022.101647
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12904/15668
dc.description© 2022 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd. This is an open access article under the CC BY license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).en_US
dc.description.abstractSummary Sleep deprivation, alone or in combination with pharmacological treatment and as part of a chronotherapy package, is of potential use for people with major depressive episodes, however the evidence base is still conflicting. The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis is to assess the clinical effects of sleep deprivation in comparison to any other intervention for the acute and long-term treatment of mood disorders. We searched electronic databases and trial registries (last update: 16th October 2021) for published and unpublished randomised controlled trials recruiting participants with a major depressive episode in unipolar or bipolar affective disorder. The clinical outcomes of interest were the reduction in depressive symptoms at different timepoints and the number of participants experiencing at least one side effect. Overall, 29 trials (1246 participants) were included. We did not find any difference in change in symptoms or all-cause discontinuation between interventions including SD compared to a control of the same intervention except without SD. In the included studies there were no available data for adverse events. Using the most methodologically rigorous approach, we did not find evidence that the addition of sleep deprivation to treatment packages leads to enhanced depressive outcomes.
dc.description.urihttps://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1087079222000600en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectSleep wake disordersen_US
dc.subjectDepressive disorderen_US
dc.subjectBipolar disorderen_US
dc.titleSleep deprivation as a treatment for major depressive episodes: A systematic review and meta-analysisen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
rioxxterms.funderDefault funderen_US
rioxxterms.identifier.projectDefault projecten_US
rioxxterms.versionNAen_US
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen_US
refterms.dateFOA2022-10-03T08:54:36Z
refterms.panelUnspecifieden_US
refterms.dateFirstOnline2022-06-11
html.description.abstractSummary Sleep deprivation, alone or in combination with pharmacological treatment and as part of a chronotherapy package, is of potential use for people with major depressive episodes, however the evidence base is still conflicting. The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis is to assess the clinical effects of sleep deprivation in comparison to any other intervention for the acute and long-term treatment of mood disorders. We searched electronic databases and trial registries (last update: 16th October 2021) for published and unpublished randomised controlled trials recruiting participants with a major depressive episode in unipolar or bipolar affective disorder. The clinical outcomes of interest were the reduction in depressive symptoms at different timepoints and the number of participants experiencing at least one side effect. Overall, 29 trials (1246 participants) were included. We did not find any difference in change in symptoms or all-cause discontinuation between interventions including SD compared to a control of the same intervention except without SD. In the included studies there were no available data for adverse events. Using the most methodologically rigorous approach, we did not find evidence that the addition of sleep deprivation to treatment packages leads to enhanced depressive outcomes.en_US
rioxxterms.funder.project94a427429a5bcfef7dd04c33360d80cden_US


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