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dc.contributor.authorMorriss, Richard K.
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-04T09:41:46Z
dc.date.available2022-08-04T09:41:46Z
dc.date.issued2022
dc.identifier.citationTyrer, F., Morriss, R., Kiani, R., Gangadharan, S. K., Kundaje, H. & Rutherford, M. J. (2022). Health needs and their relationship with life expectancy in people with and without intellectual disabilities in England. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 19(11), pp.6602.en_US
dc.identifier.other10.3390/ijerph19116602
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12904/15683
dc.description.abstractHealth needs are common in people living with intellectual disabilities, but we do not know how they contribute to life expectancy. We used the Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD) linked with hospital/mortality data in England (2017-2019) to explore life expectancy among people with or without intellectual disabilities, indicated by the presence or absence, respectively, of: epilepsy; incontinence; severe visual loss; severe visual impairment; severe mobility difficulties; cerebral palsy and PEG feeding. Life expectancy and 95% confidence intervals were compared using flexible parametric methods. At baseline, 46.4% (total n = 7794) of individuals with intellectual disabilities compared with 9.7% (total n = 176,807) in the comparison group had ≥1 health need. Epilepsy was the most common health need (18.7% vs. 1.1%). All health needs except hearing impairment were associated with shorter life expectancy: PEG feeding and mobility difficulties were associated with the greatest loss in life years (65-68% and 41-44%, respectively). Differential life expectancy attenuated but remained (≈12% life years lost) even after restricting the population to those without health needs (additional years expected to live at 10 years: 65.5 [60.3, 71.1] vs. 74.3 [73.8, 74.7]). We conclude that health needs play a significant role but do not explain all of the differential life expectancy experienced by people with intellectual disabilities.
dc.description.urihttps://www.mdpi.com/1660-4601/19/11/6602en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectEpilepsyen_US
dc.subjectLife expectancyen_US
dc.subjectCerebral palsyen_US
dc.subjectIntellectual disabilityen_US
dc.subjectEpidemiologyen_US
dc.subjectDisabled personsen_US
dc.titleHealth needs and their relationship with life expectancy in people with and without intellectual disabilities in Englanden_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
rioxxterms.funderDefault funderen_US
rioxxterms.identifier.projectDefault projecten_US
rioxxterms.versionNAen_US
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen_US
refterms.dateFOA2022-10-03T09:06:03Z
refterms.panelUnspecifieden_US
refterms.dateFirstOnline2022-05-28
html.description.abstractHealth needs are common in people living with intellectual disabilities, but we do not know how they contribute to life expectancy. We used the Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD) linked with hospital/mortality data in England (2017-2019) to explore life expectancy among people with or without intellectual disabilities, indicated by the presence or absence, respectively, of: epilepsy; incontinence; severe visual loss; severe visual impairment; severe mobility difficulties; cerebral palsy and PEG feeding. Life expectancy and 95% confidence intervals were compared using flexible parametric methods. At baseline, 46.4% (total n = 7794) of individuals with intellectual disabilities compared with 9.7% (total n = 176,807) in the comparison group had ≥1 health need. Epilepsy was the most common health need (18.7% vs. 1.1%). All health needs except hearing impairment were associated with shorter life expectancy: PEG feeding and mobility difficulties were associated with the greatest loss in life years (65-68% and 41-44%, respectively). Differential life expectancy attenuated but remained (≈12% life years lost) even after restricting the population to those without health needs (additional years expected to live at 10 years: 65.5 [60.3, 71.1] vs. 74.3 [73.8, 74.7]). We conclude that health needs play a significant role but do not explain all of the differential life expectancy experienced by people with intellectual disabilities.en_US
rioxxterms.funder.project94a427429a5bcfef7dd04c33360d80cden_US


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