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dc.contributor.authorThompson, Bethany
dc.contributor.authordas Nair, Roshan
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-04T10:07:50Z
dc.date.available2022-08-04T10:07:50Z
dc.date.issued2022
dc.identifier.citationThompson, B., Moghaddam, N., Evangelou, N., Baufeldt, A. & das Nair, R. (2022). Effectiveness of acceptance and commitment therapy for improving quality of life and mood in individuals with multiple sclerosis: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Multiple Sclerosis and Related Disorders, 63, pp.103862.en_US
dc.identifier.other10.1016/j.msard.2022.103862
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12904/15691
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVETo review the evidence for the effectiveness of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) intervention on quality of life and mood, for individuals with Multiple Sclerosis (MS).METHODA systematic search was conducted of PsycINFO, CINAHL, Embase, MEDLINE, Web of Science, Scopus and ContextualScience.org up to 13/01/2022. Grey literature was also searched via ProQuest Dissertations and Theses, and PROSPERO. We included Randomised Controlled Trials (RCTs) published in English, that examined the effectiveness of ACT for people with a diagnosis of MS. We were interested in outcomes of Quality of Life (QoL), mood (e.g., anxiety, depression and stress), and ACT-targeted processes. Methodological quality was assessed using the Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool v2. Where available, the extracted data were entered into a meta-analysis to determine weighted effect size estimates for the outcomes of interest.RESULTSSix studies (191 participants), out of 142 identified, met inclusion criteria. Meta-analyses indicated a statistically significant small effect on stress (SMD = -0.49 [95% CI of -0.89 - -0.08]), in favour of ACT. There were no statistically significant effects of ACT on anxiety (SMD = -0.41 [95% CI of -0.93 - 0.11]), depression (SMD = -0.92 [95% CI of -1.91 - 0.06]), or ACT-targeted processes (SMD = -0.18 [95% CI of -0.62 - 0.25]). There was a small, nonsignificant effect on QoL, in favour of control conditions (SMD=0.39 [95% CI of -0.08 - 0.85]). Methodological quality of the studies was variable; all but one study had at least one high risk of bias.CONCLUSIONSFindings suggest a small effect of ACT on reducing stress for people with MS, but not reducing anxiety or depression, or improving quality of life. Due to small sample sizes and few studies within this area, generalisability of findings is limited. Future trials should be pay more attention to methodological rigour.
dc.description.urihttps://www.msard-journal.com/article/S2211-0348(22)00374-1/en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectMultiple sclerosisen_US
dc.subjectAcceptance and commitment therapyen_US
dc.subjectCognitive behavioural therapyen_US
dc.titleEffectiveness of acceptance and commitment therapy for improving quality of life and mood in individuals with multiple sclerosis: A systematic review and meta-analysisen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
rioxxterms.funderDefault funderen_US
rioxxterms.identifier.projectDefault projecten_US
rioxxterms.versionNAen_US
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen_US
refterms.panelUnspecifieden_US
refterms.dateFirstOnline2022-07-01
html.description.abstractOBJECTIVETo review the evidence for the effectiveness of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) intervention on quality of life and mood, for individuals with Multiple Sclerosis (MS).METHODA systematic search was conducted of PsycINFO, CINAHL, Embase, MEDLINE, Web of Science, Scopus and ContextualScience.org up to 13/01/2022. Grey literature was also searched via ProQuest Dissertations and Theses, and PROSPERO. We included Randomised Controlled Trials (RCTs) published in English, that examined the effectiveness of ACT for people with a diagnosis of MS. We were interested in outcomes of Quality of Life (QoL), mood (e.g., anxiety, depression and stress), and ACT-targeted processes. Methodological quality was assessed using the Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool v2. Where available, the extracted data were entered into a meta-analysis to determine weighted effect size estimates for the outcomes of interest.RESULTSSix studies (191 participants), out of 142 identified, met inclusion criteria. Meta-analyses indicated a statistically significant small effect on stress (SMD = -0.49 [95% CI of -0.89 - -0.08]), in favour of ACT. There were no statistically significant effects of ACT on anxiety (SMD = -0.41 [95% CI of -0.93 - 0.11]), depression (SMD = -0.92 [95% CI of -1.91 - 0.06]), or ACT-targeted processes (SMD = -0.18 [95% CI of -0.62 - 0.25]). There was a small, nonsignificant effect on QoL, in favour of control conditions (SMD=0.39 [95% CI of -0.08 - 0.85]). Methodological quality of the studies was variable; all but one study had at least one high risk of bias.CONCLUSIONSFindings suggest a small effect of ACT on reducing stress for people with MS, but not reducing anxiety or depression, or improving quality of life. Due to small sample sizes and few studies within this area, generalisability of findings is limited. Future trials should be pay more attention to methodological rigour.en_US
rioxxterms.funder.project94a427429a5bcfef7dd04c33360d80cden_US


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