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dc.contributor.authorLiddle, Peter F.
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-04T10:25:36Z
dc.date.available2022-08-04T10:25:36Z
dc.date.issued2022
dc.identifier.citationLiang, L., Heinrichs, R. W., Liddle, P. F., Jeon, P., Théberge, J. & Palaniyappan, L. (2022). Cortical impoverishment in a stable subgroup of schizophrenia: Validation across various stages of psychosis. Schizophrenia Research, DOI: 10.1016/j.schres.2022.05.013en_US
dc.identifier.other10.1016/j.schres.2022.05.013
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12904/15695
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUNDCortical thinning is a well-known feature in schizophrenia. The considerable variation in the spatial distribution of thickness changes has been used to parse heterogeneity. A 'cortical impoverishment' subgroup with a generalized reduction in thickness has been reported. However, it is unclear if this subgroup is recoverable irrespective of illness stage, and if it relates to the glutamate hypothesis of schizophrenia.METHODSWe applied hierarchical cluster analysis to cortical thickness data from magnetic resonance imaging scans of three datasets in different stages of psychosis (n = 288; 160 patients; 128 healthy controls) and studied the cognitive and symptom profiles of the observed subgroups. In one of the samples, we also studied the subgroup differences in 7-Tesla magnetic resonance spectroscopy glutamate concentration in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex.RESULTSOur consensus-based clustering procedure consistently produced 2 subgroups of participants. Patients accounted for 75%-100% of participants in one subgroup that was characterized by significantly lower cortical thickness. Both subgroups were equally symptomatic in clinically unstable stages, but cortical impoverishment indicated a higher symptom burden in a clinically stable sample and higher glutamate levels in the first-episode sample. There were no subgroup differences in cognitive and functional outcome profiles or antipsychotic exposure across all stages.CONCLUSIONSCortical thinning does not vary with functioning or cognitive impairment, but it is more prevalent among patients, especially those with glutamate excess in early stages and higher residual symptom burden at later stages, providing an important mechanistic clue to one of the several possible pathways to the illness.
dc.description.urihttps://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0920996422001888?via%3Dihuben_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectMagnetic resonance spectroscopyen_US
dc.subjectSchizophreniaen_US
dc.titleCortical impoverishment in a stable subgroup of schizophrenia: Validation across various stages of psychosisen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
rioxxterms.funderDefault funderen_US
rioxxterms.identifier.projectDefault projecten_US
rioxxterms.versionNAen_US
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen_US
refterms.panelUnspecifieden_US
refterms.dateFirstOnline2022-05-26
html.description.abstractBACKGROUNDCortical thinning is a well-known feature in schizophrenia. The considerable variation in the spatial distribution of thickness changes has been used to parse heterogeneity. A 'cortical impoverishment' subgroup with a generalized reduction in thickness has been reported. However, it is unclear if this subgroup is recoverable irrespective of illness stage, and if it relates to the glutamate hypothesis of schizophrenia.METHODSWe applied hierarchical cluster analysis to cortical thickness data from magnetic resonance imaging scans of three datasets in different stages of psychosis (n = 288; 160 patients; 128 healthy controls) and studied the cognitive and symptom profiles of the observed subgroups. In one of the samples, we also studied the subgroup differences in 7-Tesla magnetic resonance spectroscopy glutamate concentration in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex.RESULTSOur consensus-based clustering procedure consistently produced 2 subgroups of participants. Patients accounted for 75%-100% of participants in one subgroup that was characterized by significantly lower cortical thickness. Both subgroups were equally symptomatic in clinically unstable stages, but cortical impoverishment indicated a higher symptom burden in a clinically stable sample and higher glutamate levels in the first-episode sample. There were no subgroup differences in cognitive and functional outcome profiles or antipsychotic exposure across all stages.CONCLUSIONSCortical thinning does not vary with functioning or cognitive impairment, but it is more prevalent among patients, especially those with glutamate excess in early stages and higher residual symptom burden at later stages, providing an important mechanistic clue to one of the several possible pathways to the illness.en_US
rioxxterms.funder.project94a427429a5bcfef7dd04c33360d80cden_US


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