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dc.contributor.authorYates, Jennifer A.
dc.contributor.authorDening, Tom
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-04T12:51:09Z
dc.date.available2022-08-04T12:51:09Z
dc.date.issued2022
dc.identifier.citationWalker, K., Yates, J. A., Dening, T., Völlm, B., Tomlin, J. & Griffiths, C. (2022). Staff perspectives on barriers to and facilitators of quality of life, health, wellbeing, recovery and reduced risk for older forensic mental-health patients: A qualitative interview study. Journal of Health Services Research and Policy, DOI: 10.1177/13558196221094512en_US
dc.identifier.other10.1177/13558196221094512
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12904/15702
dc.description.abstractObjectivesThere is a lack of research informing service delivery for older forensic mental health patients. This study explored service provision in forensic mental health inpatient and community services in England, investigating what is required for progress in terms of quality of life, health, wellbeing, recovery and reduced risk, and the barriers and facilitators associated with this.MethodsSemi-structured interviews were undertaken with 48 members of staff working with older forensic mental health patients in secure inpatient units or the community in England. Data were analysed using thematic analysis.ResultsTwo global themes ?What works? and ?What doesn?t work? were identified comprising themes representing environmental, interpersonal and individual factors. ?What works? included: positive social support and relationships; individualised holistic patient-centred care; hub and spoke approach to patient care; and suitable environments. ?What doesn?t work? included: absence of/or maladaptive relationships with family and friends; gaps in service provision; and unsuitable environments.ConclusionsFor older patients to progress to improved quality of life, health, wellbeing and reduced risk, multilevel and comprehensive support is required, comprising a range of services, interventions, and multidisciplinary input, and individualised to each patient?s needs. The physical environment needs to be adapted for older patients and provide a social environment that seeks to include supportive families, friends and expert professional input. A clear patient progression pathway is required; this must be reflected in policy and provision.
dc.description.urihttps://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/13558196221094512en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectQuality of lifeen_US
dc.subjectQuality of health careen_US
dc.subjectAgingen_US
dc.subjectHigh security facilitiesen_US
dc.subjectMedium security facilitiesen_US
dc.subjectLow security facilitiesen_US
dc.subjectCommunity mental health serviceen_US
dc.titleStaff perspectives on barriers to and facilitators of quality of life, health, wellbeing, recovery and reduced risk for older forensic mental-health patients: A qualitative interview studyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
rioxxterms.funderDefault funderen_US
rioxxterms.identifier.projectDefault projecten_US
rioxxterms.versionNAen_US
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen_US
refterms.panelUnspecifieden_US
refterms.dateFirstOnline2022-05-18
html.description.abstractObjectivesThere is a lack of research informing service delivery for older forensic mental health patients. This study explored service provision in forensic mental health inpatient and community services in England, investigating what is required for progress in terms of quality of life, health, wellbeing, recovery and reduced risk, and the barriers and facilitators associated with this.MethodsSemi-structured interviews were undertaken with 48 members of staff working with older forensic mental health patients in secure inpatient units or the community in England. Data were analysed using thematic analysis.ResultsTwo global themes ?What works? and ?What doesn?t work? were identified comprising themes representing environmental, interpersonal and individual factors. ?What works? included: positive social support and relationships; individualised holistic patient-centred care; hub and spoke approach to patient care; and suitable environments. ?What doesn?t work? included: absence of/or maladaptive relationships with family and friends; gaps in service provision; and unsuitable environments.ConclusionsFor older patients to progress to improved quality of life, health, wellbeing and reduced risk, multilevel and comprehensive support is required, comprising a range of services, interventions, and multidisciplinary input, and individualised to each patient?s needs. The physical environment needs to be adapted for older patients and provide a social environment that seeks to include supportive families, friends and expert professional input. A clear patient progression pathway is required; this must be reflected in policy and provision.en_US
rioxxterms.funder.project94a427429a5bcfef7dd04c33360d80cden_US


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