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dc.contributor.authorRennie, Winston
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-05T15:14:28Z
dc.date.available2022-08-05T15:14:28Z
dc.date.issued2022-07
dc.identifier.citationRata, M., Blackledge, M., Scurr, E., Winfield, J., Koh, D. M., Dragan, A., Candito, A., King, A., Rennie, W., Gaba, S., Suresh, P., Malcolm, P., Davis, A., Nilak, A., Shah, A., Gandhi, S., Albrizio, M., Drury, A., Roberts, S., Jenner, M., … Messiou, C. (2022). Implementation of Whole-Body MRI (MY-RADS) within the OPTIMUM/MUKnine multi-centre clinical trial for patients with myeloma. Insights into imaging, 13(1), 123. https://doi.org/10.1186/s13244-022-01253-0en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12904/15709
dc.description.abstractBackground: Whole-body (WB) MRI, which includes diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and T1-w Dixon, permits sensitive detection of marrow disease in addition to qualitative and quantitative measurements of disease and response to treatment of bone marrow. We report on the first study to embed standardised WB-MRI within a prospective, multi-centre myeloma clinical trial (IMAGIMM trial, sub-study of OPTIMUM/MUKnine) to explore the use of WB-MRI to detect minimal residual disease after treatment. Methods: The standardised MY-RADS WB-MRI protocol was set up on a local 1.5 T scanner. An imaging manual describing the MR protocol, quality assurance/control procedures and data transfer was produced and provided to sites. For non-identical scanners (different vendor or magnet strength), site visits from our physics team were organised to support protocol optimisation. The site qualification process included review of phantom and volunteer data acquired at each site and a teleconference to brief the multidisciplinary team. Image quality of initial patients at each site was assessed. Results: WB-MRI was successfully set up at 12 UK sites involving 3 vendor systems and two field strengths. Four main protocols (1.5 T Siemens, 3 T Siemens, 1.5 T Philips and 3 T GE scanners) were generated. Scanner limitations (hardware and software) and scanning time constraint required protocol modifications for 4 sites. Nevertheless, shared methodology and imaging protocols enabled other centres to obtain images suitable for qualitative and quantitative analysis. Conclusions: Standardised WB-MRI protocols can be implemented and supported in prospective multi-centre clinical trials. Trial registration NCT03188172 clinicaltrials.gov; registration date 15th June 2017 https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/study/NCT03188172.
dc.description.urihttps://insightsimaging.springeropen.com/articles/10.1186/s13244-022-01253-0en_US
dc.subjectDWIen_US
dc.subjectmulti-centre clinical trialen_US
dc.subjectmyelomaen_US
dc.subjectT1-w Dixonen_US
dc.subjectwhole-body MRIen_US
dc.titleImplementation of Whole-Body MRI (MY-RADS) within the OPTIMUM/MUKnine multi-centre clinical trial for patients with myelomaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
rioxxterms.funderDefault funderen_US
rioxxterms.identifier.projectDefault projecten_US
rioxxterms.versionNAen_US
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1186/s13244-022-01253-0en_US
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen_US
refterms.panelUnspecifieden_US
html.description.abstractBackground: Whole-body (WB) MRI, which includes diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and T1-w Dixon, permits sensitive detection of marrow disease in addition to qualitative and quantitative measurements of disease and response to treatment of bone marrow. We report on the first study to embed standardised WB-MRI within a prospective, multi-centre myeloma clinical trial (IMAGIMM trial, sub-study of OPTIMUM/MUKnine) to explore the use of WB-MRI to detect minimal residual disease after treatment. Methods: The standardised MY-RADS WB-MRI protocol was set up on a local 1.5 T scanner. An imaging manual describing the MR protocol, quality assurance/control procedures and data transfer was produced and provided to sites. For non-identical scanners (different vendor or magnet strength), site visits from our physics team were organised to support protocol optimisation. The site qualification process included review of phantom and volunteer data acquired at each site and a teleconference to brief the multidisciplinary team. Image quality of initial patients at each site was assessed. Results: WB-MRI was successfully set up at 12 UK sites involving 3 vendor systems and two field strengths. Four main protocols (1.5 T Siemens, 3 T Siemens, 1.5 T Philips and 3 T GE scanners) were generated. Scanner limitations (hardware and software) and scanning time constraint required protocol modifications for 4 sites. Nevertheless, shared methodology and imaging protocols enabled other centres to obtain images suitable for qualitative and quantitative analysis. Conclusions: Standardised WB-MRI protocols can be implemented and supported in prospective multi-centre clinical trials. Trial registration NCT03188172 clinicaltrials.gov; registration date 15th June 2017 https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/study/NCT03188172.en_US
rioxxterms.funder.project94a427429a5bcfef7dd04c33360d80cden_US


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