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dc.contributor.authorLlewellyn-Beardsley, Joy
dc.contributor.authorRennick-Egglestone, Stefan
dc.contributor.authorAli, Yasmin
dc.contributor.authorWatson, Emma
dc.contributor.authorYeo, Caroline
dc.contributor.authorNg, Fiona
dc.contributor.authorSlade, Mike
dc.date.accessioned2022-09-09T14:53:21Z
dc.date.available2022-09-09T14:53:21Z
dc.date.issued2022
dc.identifier.citationLlewellyn-Beardsley, J., Rennick-Egglestone, S., Pollock, K., Ali, Y., Watson, E., Franklin, D., Yeo, C., Ng, F., McGranahan, R., Slade, M., et al. (2022). ‘Maybe I shouldn’t talk’: The role of power in the telling of mental health recovery stories. Qualitative Health Research, DOI: 10.1177/10497323221118239en_US
dc.identifier.other10.1177/10497323221118239
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12904/15775
dc.description.abstractMental health ?recovery narratives? are increasingly used within teaching, learning and practice environments. The mainstreaming of their use has been critiqued by scholars and activists as a co-option of lived experience for organisational purposes. But how people report their experiences of telling their stories has not been investigated at scale. We present accounts from 71 people with lived experience of multiple inequalities of telling their stories in formal and informal settings. A reflexive thematic analysis was conducted within a critical constructivist approach. Our overarching finding was that questions of power were central to all accounts. Four themes were identified: (1) Challenging the status quo; (2) Risky consequences; (3) Producing ?acceptable? stories; (4) Untellable stories. We discuss how the concept of narrative power foregrounds inequalities in settings within which recovery stories are invited and co-constructed, and conclude that power imbalances complicate the seemingly benign act of telling stories of lived experience.
dc.description.urihttps://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/10497323221118239en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectMental health recoveryen_US
dc.subjectPersonal narrativeen_US
dc.subjectMental healthen_US
dc.subjectStigmaen_US
dc.subjectVulnerable populationsen_US
dc.title‘Maybe I shouldn’t talk’: The role of power in the telling of mental health recovery storiesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
rioxxterms.funderDefault funderen_US
rioxxterms.identifier.projectDefault projecten_US
rioxxterms.versionNAen_US
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen_US
refterms.dateFOA2022-10-05T12:49:35Z
refterms.panelUnspecifieden_US
refterms.dateFirstOnline2022-08-18
html.description.abstractMental health ?recovery narratives? are increasingly used within teaching, learning and practice environments. The mainstreaming of their use has been critiqued by scholars and activists as a co-option of lived experience for organisational purposes. But how people report their experiences of telling their stories has not been investigated at scale. We present accounts from 71 people with lived experience of multiple inequalities of telling their stories in formal and informal settings. A reflexive thematic analysis was conducted within a critical constructivist approach. Our overarching finding was that questions of power were central to all accounts. Four themes were identified: (1) Challenging the status quo; (2) Risky consequences; (3) Producing ?acceptable? stories; (4) Untellable stories. We discuss how the concept of narrative power foregrounds inequalities in settings within which recovery stories are invited and co-constructed, and conclude that power imbalances complicate the seemingly benign act of telling stories of lived experience.en_US
rioxxterms.funder.project94a427429a5bcfef7dd04c33360d80cden_US


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