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dc.contributor.authorBrand, Sarah
dc.contributor.authorMusgrove, Alison
dc.date.accessioned2022-11-22T14:29:24Z
dc.date.available2022-11-22T14:29:24Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.citationBrand, S.L., Musgrove, A., Jeffcoate, W.J. and Lincoln, N.B. (2016) 'Evaluation of the effect of nurse education on patient-reported foot checks and foot care behaviour of people with diabetes receiving haemodialysis', Diabetic medicine : a journal of the British Diabetic Association, 33(2), pp. 204-7. doi: https://dx.doi.org/10.1111/dme.12831.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1464-5491
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12904/16005
dc.description.abstractAIMS: To assess whether a programme of nurse education increased the frequency with which nurses conducted foot checks on people with diabetes undergoing haemodialysis and to evaluate whether this influenced self-reported foot care behaviour., METHODS: A non-randomized stepped-wedge design was used to evaluate a nurse education programme implemented in four UK National Health Service dialysis units. People with diabetes undergoing haemodialysis were invited to complete a questionnaire on the frequency of foot examination by health professionals, on the presence of foot problems and on their own foot care behaviour, using the Nottingham Assessment of Functional Foot-care (NAFF). An education session for nurses, including procedures for foot examination, was conducted sequentially in each of four haemodialysis units. The questionnaire was repeated at 2-monthly intervals., RESULTS: The education session resulted in a significant increase in the reported number of foot examinations by nurses (P = 0.007). There was also a significant improvement in reported foot care behaviour (P < 0.001), but this occurred between the first and second 2-monthly assessments and was unrelated to the timing of the intervention., CONCLUSIONS: A single education session can improve the routine checking of the feet of people with diabetes undergoing haemodialysis. The administration of the Nottingham Assessment of Functional Foot-care questionnaire was associated with improved self-reported foot care behaviour, reflecting greater awareness of risk in this population. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2015 Diabetes UK.
dc.description.urihttps://dx.doi.org/10.1111/dme.12831en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherJohn Wiley and Sons Ltden_US
dc.subjectDiabetic footen_US
dc.subjectProfessional roleen_US
dc.subjectRenal dialysisen_US
dc.subjectSelf careen_US
dc.titleEvaluation of the effect of nurse education on patient-reported foot checks and foot care behaviour of people with diabetes receiving haemodialysisen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
rioxxterms.funderDefault funderen_US
rioxxterms.identifier.projectDefault projecten_US
rioxxterms.versionNAen_US
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1111/dme.12831en_US
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen_US
refterms.panelUnspecifieden_US
refterms.dateFirstOnline2016
html.description.abstractAIMS: To assess whether a programme of nurse education increased the frequency with which nurses conducted foot checks on people with diabetes undergoing haemodialysis and to evaluate whether this influenced self-reported foot care behaviour., METHODS: A non-randomized stepped-wedge design was used to evaluate a nurse education programme implemented in four UK National Health Service dialysis units. People with diabetes undergoing haemodialysis were invited to complete a questionnaire on the frequency of foot examination by health professionals, on the presence of foot problems and on their own foot care behaviour, using the Nottingham Assessment of Functional Foot-care (NAFF). An education session for nurses, including procedures for foot examination, was conducted sequentially in each of four haemodialysis units. The questionnaire was repeated at 2-monthly intervals., RESULTS: The education session resulted in a significant increase in the reported number of foot examinations by nurses (P = 0.007). There was also a significant improvement in reported foot care behaviour (P < 0.001), but this occurred between the first and second 2-monthly assessments and was unrelated to the timing of the intervention., CONCLUSIONS: A single education session can improve the routine checking of the feet of people with diabetes undergoing haemodialysis. The administration of the Nottingham Assessment of Functional Foot-care questionnaire was associated with improved self-reported foot care behaviour, reflecting greater awareness of risk in this population. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2015 Diabetes UK.en_US
rioxxterms.funder.project94a427429a5bcfef7dd04c33360d80cden_US


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