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dc.contributor.authorBriggs, Lydia
dc.contributor.authorCooper, Joanne
dc.date.accessioned2022-11-23T17:17:32Z
dc.date.available2022-11-23T17:17:32Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.citationBriggs, L., Cooper, J., Cox, K. & Blake, H. (2020). Concerns, coping and the electronic Holistic Needs Assessment: experiences of UK breast cancer survivors. Journal of Research in Nursing 25(2), 97–110. https://doi.org/10.1177/1744987119829801en_US
dc.identifier.issn1744-988X
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12904/16032
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Physical and psychological concerns associated with a breast cancer diagnosis continue long after treatment. Macmillan Cancer Support developed an electronic Holistic Needs Assessment (eHNA) to help identify these concerns and allow a healthcare professional to address these as part of The Recovery Package., AIMS: The study aim was to understand the women's experiences of having breast cancer, and of completing Macmillan's eHNA as part of their care., METHODS: A qualitative approach was adopted. Semi-structured interviews were undertaken with 15 women, 12-18 months following surgical treatment for invasive breast cancer. Thematic analysis identified key themes., RESULTS: Four main themes were identified in relation to experiences of the eHNA, experiences of breast cancer, coping with breast cancer and the psychological effects of surviving. Perceptions towards the eHNA varied; some women viewed the eHNA as a research tool for hospital use rather than a beneficial aspect of their care. Several participants felt unable to raise their psychological concerns on the eHNA., CONCLUSIONS: Although experiences differ, psychological issues remain a key factor for women with breast cancer, lasting long after treatment. The eHNA is not currently used to its potential or recognised by women as a tool to support their care. Further research is needed into how the eHNA can be used effectively to capture psychological concerns and determine best approaches to implementation of the tool to support individualised care. Copyright © The Author(s) 2019.
dc.description.urihttps://doi.org/10.1177/1744987119829801en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherSageen_US
dc.subjectBreast neoplasmsen_US
dc.subjectSurvivorshipen_US
dc.titleConcerns, coping and the electronic holistic needs assessment: experiences of UK breast cancer survivorsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
rioxxterms.funderDefault funderen_US
rioxxterms.identifier.projectDefault projecten_US
rioxxterms.versionNAen_US
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1177/1744987119829801en_US
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen_US
refterms.panelUnspecifieden_US
refterms.dateFirstOnline2020
html.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Physical and psychological concerns associated with a breast cancer diagnosis continue long after treatment. Macmillan Cancer Support developed an electronic Holistic Needs Assessment (eHNA) to help identify these concerns and allow a healthcare professional to address these as part of The Recovery Package., AIMS: The study aim was to understand the women's experiences of having breast cancer, and of completing Macmillan's eHNA as part of their care., METHODS: A qualitative approach was adopted. Semi-structured interviews were undertaken with 15 women, 12-18 months following surgical treatment for invasive breast cancer. Thematic analysis identified key themes., RESULTS: Four main themes were identified in relation to experiences of the eHNA, experiences of breast cancer, coping with breast cancer and the psychological effects of surviving. Perceptions towards the eHNA varied; some women viewed the eHNA as a research tool for hospital use rather than a beneficial aspect of their care. Several participants felt unable to raise their psychological concerns on the eHNA., CONCLUSIONS: Although experiences differ, psychological issues remain a key factor for women with breast cancer, lasting long after treatment. The eHNA is not currently used to its potential or recognised by women as a tool to support their care. Further research is needed into how the eHNA can be used effectively to capture psychological concerns and determine best approaches to implementation of the tool to support individualised care. Copyright © The Author(s) 2019.en_US
rioxxterms.funder.project94a427429a5bcfef7dd04c33360d80cden_US


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