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dc.contributor.authorRobinson, Thompson
dc.date.accessioned2023-04-26T11:09:53Z
dc.date.available2023-04-26T11:09:53Z
dc.date.issued2022-03-28
dc.identifier.citationIntharakham, K., Panerai, R. B., & Robinson, T. G. (2022). The scalability of common paradigms for assessment of cognitive function: A functional transcranial Doppler study. PloS one, 17(3), e0266048. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0266048en_US
dc.identifier.other10.1371/journal.pone.0266048
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12904/16854
dc.description.abstractCognitive paradigms induce changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) associated with increased metabolic demand, namely neurovascular coupling (NVC). We tested the hypothesis that the effect of complexity and duration of cognitive paradigms will either enhance or inhibit the NVC response. Bilateral CBF velocity (CBFV) in the middle cerebral arteries (MCAs) via transcranial Doppler ultrasound (TCD), blood pressure (BP), electrocardiogram (ECG) and end-tidal CO2 (EtCO2) of 16 healthy participants (aged 21-71 years) were simultaneously recorded at rest and during randomized paradigms of different complexities (naming words beginning with P-,R-,V- words and serial subtractions of 100-2,100-7,1000-17), and durations (5s, 30s and 60s). CBFV responses were population mean normalized from a 30-s baseline period prior to task initiation. A significant increase in bilateral CBFV response was observed at the start of all paradigms and provided a similar pattern in most responses, irrespective of complexity or duration. Although significant inter-hemispherical differences were found during performance of R-word and all serial subtraction paradigms, no lateralisation was observed in more complex naming word tasks. Also, the effect of duration was manifested at late stages of 100-7, but not for other paradigms. CBFV responses could not distinguish different levels of complexity or duration with a single presentation of the cognitive paradigm. Further studies of the ordinal scalability of the NVC response are needed with more advanced modelling techniques, or different types of neural stimulation.
dc.description.urihttps://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0266048en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleThe scalability of common paradigms for assessment of cognitive function: A functional transcranial Doppler studyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
rioxxterms.funderDefault funderen_US
rioxxterms.identifier.projectDefault projecten_US
rioxxterms.versionNAen_US
rioxxterms.versionofrecordhttps://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0266048en_US
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen_US
refterms.panelUnspecifieden_US
html.description.abstractCognitive paradigms induce changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) associated with increased metabolic demand, namely neurovascular coupling (NVC). We tested the hypothesis that the effect of complexity and duration of cognitive paradigms will either enhance or inhibit the NVC response. Bilateral CBF velocity (CBFV) in the middle cerebral arteries (MCAs) via transcranial Doppler ultrasound (TCD), blood pressure (BP), electrocardiogram (ECG) and end-tidal CO2 (EtCO2) of 16 healthy participants (aged 21-71 years) were simultaneously recorded at rest and during randomized paradigms of different complexities (naming words beginning with P-,R-,V- words and serial subtractions of 100-2,100-7,1000-17), and durations (5s, 30s and 60s). CBFV responses were population mean normalized from a 30-s baseline period prior to task initiation. A significant increase in bilateral CBFV response was observed at the start of all paradigms and provided a similar pattern in most responses, irrespective of complexity or duration. Although significant inter-hemispherical differences were found during performance of R-word and all serial subtraction paradigms, no lateralisation was observed in more complex naming word tasks. Also, the effect of duration was manifested at late stages of 100-7, but not for other paradigms. CBFV responses could not distinguish different levels of complexity or duration with a single presentation of the cognitive paradigm. Further studies of the ordinal scalability of the NVC response are needed with more advanced modelling techniques, or different types of neural stimulation.en_US
rioxxterms.funder.project94a427429a5bcfef7dd04c33360d80cden_US


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